First look: Toshiba TDP-ET20 DVD projector

The TDP-ET20 is a standard-definition player with a 16:9 resolution
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Toshiba has shown off its new home cinema projector - the TDP-ET20 - in an exclusive demonstration to Tech.co.uk. It has a built-in DVD player and 5.1 surround sound speakers.

It's a standard definition projector (854 x 480 pixels), supporting a 16:9 resolution - but the image was impressively sharp nonetheless. The built-in speakers, however, weren't so impressive, although external ones can be attached.

The TDP-ET20 uses 'extreme short throw' technology, meaning the projector can sit relatively close to the wall and still produce a huge, sharp image. Sitting just 1.3m away, it impressively produced an image 2.5m wide; traditional projectors have to sit some distance from the wall to achieve the same effect.

Specifications-wise, the projector has a contrast ratio of 2500:1 and 1200 lumens brightness from a 230W lamp.

HDMI

Despite not being HD, the ET20 has an HDMI port - these are usually found exclusively on high-definition devices. It also has RCA ports, S-video, an RGB input and supports PAL, NTSC and SECAM video standards.

We were even surprised to learn it supports DivX - a popular format for internet videos. More details can be found on Toshiba's website.

Given its wide range of ports, as well as a built-in DVD player, 5.1 surround sound speakers and 'short throw' ability, the TDP-ET20 is clearly geared towards people with small rooms. And for those who want an all-in-one solution to home theatre.

It's out now and can be found online for around £1,000. Expect the high-street price to be slightly more, though. Richard Preston

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