Earlier this year, Canon announced several new additions to its highly popular IXUS range of stylish, ultra-portable compact cameras.

The Canon IXUS 125 HS is priced as an entry-level model in the company's new lineup, yet its headline specifications are impressive.

Canon has given the IXUS 125 HS a range-topping 16.1MP back-illuminated CMOS sensor, as well the brand new Digic 5 processing chip. If Canon's claims are accurate, Digic 5 promises six times faster image processing and a 75 per cent reduction in image noise.

Add in the high-sensitivity (HS) capabilities of the Canon IXUS 125 HS's sensor and we have a camera that should deliver detailed images, with well-controlled image noise and good dynamic range.

Canon IXUS 125 HS review

Despite being contained in such a compact body, the Canon IXUS 125 HS contains a useful 5x optical zoom range equivalent to 24-120mm. This should give it the capacity to shoot decent group shot close-ups and extend to capture most distant subjects in detail.

A host of additional features are included to make the Canon IXUS 125 HS as simple as possible to use. The Smart Auto mode automatically selects the best camera settings from a selection of 58 presets, which should cover most shooting scenarios.

Priced at £230 in the UK or around $360 in the US, the Canon IXUS 125 HS costs around the same as fellow 16MP cameras the Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-HX9V and Samsung MV800, and more than the 16MP Nikon Coolpix S6200 and Fuji FinePix F600 EXR.

Canon IXUS 125 HS review

The camera is capable of Full HD video recording at 24fps with optical zoom enabled. To avoid excessive camera shake when recording at the telephoto end of the zoom range, the 'Intelligent IS' optical image stabilisation is also active while in movie mode.

Viewing these recordings straight from the camera on an HD-ready television is possible through the inclusion of a mini HDMI connection.

Canon's Face ID face detection system is capable of registering up to 12 specific faces, and even their corresponding ages.

The camera can then use this information to adjust shooting settings appropriately, such as deactivating the flash when the pre-programmed face of a sleeping baby is detected.