The Press Complaints Commission (PCC) is going to extend its remit to cover online-only publications.

According to the Independent, those who solely publish online will now have to subscribe to the Editors' Code of Practice, which covers other publications.

This marks a vital expansion as the web continues to grow. So far, the PCC has covered the online versions of newspapers and magazines that appear in print, but has had no control over online-only publications, which have flourished in recent years.

Increasingly important

Guy Black, Chairman of the Press Standards Board of Finance, told the newspaper: "The internet is an increasingly important platform for publishers to reach consumers.

"While online versions of newspapers and magazines available in printed form come within the remit of the PCC, there is a gap to the extent that online-only publications do not.

"This decision is a logical development in self-regulation, recognising the moves in the magazine sector towards online-only titles, and underlines the effectiveness of our system".

More regulation everywhere

This increase in the powers of the PCC comes just a month after the announcement that the Advertising Standards Agency (ASA) will have jurisdiction over website marketing claims as of late 2010. This will include social networking sites and blogs.

Currently the ASA is funded by advertisers, who pay 0.1 per cent of their annual marketing budget. The new system will be possible through seed capital provided by search giant Google.

The days of the wild 'web' west might be drawing to a close.

Via The Independent