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Sharp TU-T2 review

Fast and furious Freeview HD, but lacks the versatility other boxes offer

Sharp TU-T2
An adept Freeview HD receiver, but one we think is a bit overpriced

For

  • Excellent interface and EPG
  • HD picture quality

Against

  • Average SD pictures
  • Tiny remote control

Pros

  • + Excellent interface and EPG
  • + HD picture quality

Cons

  • - Average SD pictures
  • - Tiny remote control

With a list price of £189, Sharp's first stab at a Freeview HD set-top box seems vastly over-priced, but look online and the TU-T2 is already discounted – and a good job, too.

A basic, very small and easy to house black box is what you get, but its glossy fascia is interrupted by a rather brave lightbox studded with eight blue LEDs that twinkle and refresh every time a command is issued from the remote control.

There's also a large standby button on the front, which is good (and rather rare) news for those who hate the energy-guzzling 'always on' nature of set-top boxes.

Elsewhere the TU-T2 has all it needs to provide Freeview HD pictures – a single DVB-T2 tuner and a HDMI output. A brace of Scarts adorn the back (one to connect a VCR) alongside an Ethernet LAN port for future iPlayer-type upgrades, an optical digital audio out to hook-up to an amplifier (in Dolby Digital Plus once it comes to Freeview), a software upgrade-only USB slot and the all-important RF (and RF loopthrough) input for the aerial.

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If you fancy something a little more comprehensive, Sharp has an identical-looking step-up called the TU-T2HR32, a £299 Freeview+ HD recorder that boasts a 360GB hard disk and a couple of DVB-T2 tuners, slated for mid-June.

Jamie Carter

Jamie is a freelance tech, travel and space journalist based in the UK. He’s been writing regularly for Techradar since it was launched in 2008 and also writes regularly for Forbes, The Telegraph, the South China Morning Post, Sky & Telescope and the Sky At Night magazine as well as other Future titles T3, Digital Camera World, All About Space and Space.com. He also edits two of his own websites, TravGear.com and WhenIsTheNextEclipse.com that reflect his obsession with travel gear and solar eclipse travel. He is the author of A Stargazing Program For Beginners (Springer, 2015),