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New Samsung smartwatch is in the works, but we don't know if it's the Galaxy Watch 2

Is Samsung already working on a successor to the Galaxy Watch Active 2 (above)? (Image credit: Future)

A new leak has suggested Samsung is developing a new smartwatch, but we don't currently have a clear idea of what the product will be called when it's ready to be put on your wrist.

According to GalaxyClub - a source that has been right about Samsung leaks in the past - the company has a product in development under the model number SM-R840. 

The original Samsung Galaxy Watch was referred to as the SM-R800 ahead of launch, so this might be a new device in that series of top-end smartwatches. Then again, last year we saw the SM-R820, SM-R830, SM-R825 and SM-R835 launch, but these were products in the Galaxy Watch Active 2 series when they reached shops.

That makes it a little unclear what this new device will be called when it's officially unveiled - it could be the Galaxy Watch 2, the Galaxy Watch Active 3, or something else altogether.

The model number also appears on its own in this leak, when in the past Samsung has often introduced multiple variants of its smartwatches at the same time, with different sizes and LTE options.

It's possible that's still the case for Samsung's next smartwatch though, and this leak is just one part of the family.

The only spec included in this leak is that it will apparently have a 330mAh battery. That's a middling battery size for a smartwatch, and it's similar to the 340mAh cell that was inside the Galaxy Watch Active 2.

There's no guarantee we'll hear from Samsung soon about a new smartwatch considering it launched the Galaxy Watch Active 2 back in September, but a leaked model number may be a hint that a new product is nearing release.

Samsung is set to unveil the Galaxy S11 series on February 11 at an event in San Francisco, so it may be we hear about a new wearable alongside those new phones. If not, Samsung may wait until Mobile World Congress in February to unveil a new device, or it may come later in the year instead.

Via GadgetsAndWearables