Mozilla rolls out Firefox 67, with 'procrastination on purpose' for faster browsing

Firefox icon
Image credit: PixieMe/Shutterstock
(Image credit: PixieMe/Shutterstock)

Mozilla has unleashed a new version of Firefox, which is claims is faster than ever thanks to a strategy it's calling 'procrastinate on purpose'.

Unlike human procrastination (displacement activity like washing the dishes instead of completing a tax return), Mozilla's system involves creating a 'to-do' list and performing tasks at the optimal time.

Features that are rarely used have been deprioritized, which means the page can be rendered more quickly. For example, the browser won't search for alternative style sheets until after the page has loaded, and won't load its auto-fill module until there's actually a form on the screen that will use it.

If your system is running low on memory (below 400MB), Firefox will now suspend any tabs that you haven't used for a while. Any suspended tabs will reload when clicked.

Mozilla also says the browser will "skip a bunch of unnecessary work" at launch if you're using a custom theme or ad-blocker. It hasn't explained exactly what this involves, but presumably it means not loading elements that will be overridden by browser extensions.

Keep it secret, keep it safe

As promised earlier this year, Mozilla has added two major new security features to Firefox 67. The first of these protects against 'fingerprinting' – a technique for identifying specific computers using their unique combination of hardware settings. Once your device has been identified, unscrupulous advertisers can follow you around the web, without tracking cookies.

The second security addition provides protection from cryptocurrency miners, which usurp your machine's resources without permission when you visit an infected website. 

These two features first appeared in beta versions of Firefox last month, and after thorough testing, are ready for general release.