Over a third of BlackBerry's 120,000 apps are made by a single developer

Over a third of BlackBerry's 120,000 apps are made by a single developer
47,000 of 120,000 BlackBerry apps are from the same dev
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Earlier this year BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins touted a much-improved 120,000 apps in the App World store. What he failed to mention was that one single developer accounts for far more than his fair share.

According to a Berryreview.com report, developer S4bb has an incredible 47,000-plus applications residing within the company's understocked app portal.

The report also pointed out that, barring the first 20 or 30 submissions, S4bb's apps for BB10 and other versions of the OS, aren't really of a quality worthy a ringing endorsement from BlackBerry's CEO.

There's countless city guides, lock apps, audiobooks, phrasebooks, while there are a host of RSS feeds presented as basic applications. There's also the obligatory flatulence noise simulation app. Lovely.

Taking advantage

BlackBerry has been desperately trying to encourage developers to embrace its new platform, as it seeks to reel in Android, iOS and even Windows Phone.

It has been offering $100 (around UK£60, AU$111) per approved app, while top notch offerings can scoop up to $10,000 (about UK£6,385, AU$11,139) for when they're submitted to the app world

It appears one developer has figured out a way to take advantage that benefits neither BlackBerry, beyond the number boasts, or its users. Apparently, S4bb is not not the only one either.

BlackBerry spokesman Adam Emery said: "Developers in all app stores employ a number of different monetization tactics. BlackBerry World is an open market for developers and we let market forces dictate the success or failure of these tactics."

Via AllThingsD

A technology journalist, writer and videographer of many magazines and websites including T3, Gadget Magazine and TechRadar.com. He specializes in applications for smartphones, tablets and handheld devices, with bylines also at The Guardian, WIRED, Trusted Reviews and Wareable. Chris is also the podcast host for The Liverpool Way. As well as tech and football, Chris is a pop-punk fan and enjoys the art of wrasslin'.