New Philips Hue lighting kits bring boring walls to life

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If you’re a proud member of generation rent, you may find it hard to decorate your walls without putting your security deposit in jeopardy – but now you can now safely add color to you living room with Philips’ new Hue Play and Hue Signe lighting kits

Although previous Hue lighting kits can be used to illuminate walls, the new Hue Play and Hue Signe lighting kits are specifically designed to bounce colored light off your walls and create ambience. 

The Hue Play and Hue Signe can be connected to the Hue Bridge and Hue smartphone app, allowing you to choose from an intimidating 16 million different colors. Like all Hue products, you can also control these lights with Siri, Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa. 

Immersive color

Designed to sit in front of or behind your TV, the Hue Play can be synchronized to your entertainment systems, making home cinema and gaming sessions even more immersive without any unwanted glare.

The Hue Signe, however, is a vertical fixture which comes either as a floor or table lamp, and is best placed next to your TV or against a feature wall. It can also be synced up with entertainment, music, and gaming systems or simply used to add a splash of color to your home. 

The Internet of Things

Philips has long been a market leader in ‘smart’ lighting, and the popularity of internet-connected domestic gadgets is growing every year, with the market predicted to reach $8.9 trillion by 2024.

Smart home devices fall under the ‘Internet of Things’; in other words, physical devices with Wi-Fi connectivity and electronic sensors that allow data transfer. In the home, this can include everything from the iKettle to smart bike locks.

Pre-orders for the Philips Hue Play and Hue Signe start in September, with shipping due to commence in October. The Play starts at $70 (£55 / AU$ 76), increasing to $130 (£102 / AU$178) for a two piece kit, while the Signe starts at $160 (£126 / AU$220) for the table lamp size, and $250 (£196 / AU$343) for a floor based model.   

Via Engadget