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The Runtastic Moment is a simple smartwatch for fitness fans

Runtastic Moment
The Runtastic Moment watches
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Whether you're after a smartwatch or a more basic fitness tracker, the number of devices you have to choose from just keeps growing. The Adidas-owned Runtastic is the latest to push out a watch-cum-tracker, with its sporty-looking Moment.

Runtastic is perhaps better known for its fitness apps rather than its hardware, but the company already had a number of basic trackers on the market. This is the first device to add a watch face to the mix.

As well as telling you the time, the Moment measures steps taken, distance travelled, minutes active, calories burned and sleep time. You can set up personalised goals through the accompanying app and it will also buzz if you've been sat still for too long.

Not-so-smart watch

The watch element is fairly straightforward though: there's no touchscreen and you don't get any notifications from your smartphone on it. That puts it alongside something like the Withings Activité rather than the high-end smartwatches like the Apple Watch.

Of course one of the key advantages of that approach is it uses a conventional watch battery - you're going to get six months of use from it before the battery needs replacing, which sounds a better deal than having to charge it every night.

The wearable is waterproof to 100 metres (or 300 feet) and can store up to a week's worth of data without syncing. There are three models to choose from in a variety of colours and materials, and prices start from US$129.99 (roughly £85 or AUS$190, though we're still waiting for confirmation of international pricing).

David Nield
David Nield

Dave is a freelance tech journalist who has been writing about gadgets, apps and the web for more than two decades. Based out of Stockport, England, on TechRadar you'll find him covering news, features and reviews, particularly for phones, tablets and wearables. Working to ensure our breaking news coverage is the best in the business over weekends, David also has bylines at Gizmodo, T3, PopSci and a few other places besides, as well as being many years editing the likes of PC Explorer and The Hardware Handbook.