Skip to main content

Best LG TVs to buy in 2022: LG OLED, Nano Cell, QNED and 4K UHD TVs

PRICE
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
Looking for the best LG TV? You can't go wrong with one of LG's OLED TV models
A gamer playing a game on an LG OLED TV. (Image credit: LG)

For most folks, the best LG TV of 2022 is the LG C1 OLED. Yes, we know that's technically last year's model, but it has the best price-to-performance ratio of any LG TV released in the last few years.

And yet, despite it being one of the very best OLED TVs it might not be for absolutely everyone. That's because LG also makes some fantastic-looking 8K TVs, gorgeous QNED models with higher peak brightness, and some cheap 4K UHD TVs that could definitely work as a second screen for your kitchen or guest room.

To help you suss out which one's right for you, we've sat down and tested the very best LG TVs from this year and are keeping an eye out for next year's models. We're able to compare them to find out which is the best choice for you.

Of course, if you can't wait to see what's coming down the pipeline, now isn't a bad time to be in the market for a new LG TV. 

Best LG TV

LG C1 OLED TV in a living room environment

(Image credit: LG)
The best LG TV for most people, balancing specs and budget

Specifications

Screen size: 48-inch, 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Incredible contrast and color
+
New 83-inch size

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavy bass
-
Little improvement

The best LG TV available today for most people is the LG C1, from 2021. You're getting a knockout OLED picture, with an infinite contrast ratio, vivid colors, and deep blacks all on show. The a9 Gen 4 AI processor offers excellent image quality in areas including motion handling and upscaling, even if we found upscaled faces could gain something of a reddish tinge during their transformation.

Despite being an older model, it's as up-to-date with features as anything on the market. You're getting 4K resolution, Dolby Vision HDR, Dolby Atmos, and four HDMI 2.1 inputs too, making it totally future-proof for next-gen gaming.

And with the 2022 equivalent, the LG C2, now out (see below), it's had a huge price drop, making it probably the best-value TV you can buy if you want something with the features to last you for years, as well as excellent image quality.

Read the full review: LG C1 OLED

the lg c2 oled tv in modern living room

(Image credit: LG)
The LG TV if you need a smaller OLED, or want even better image quality

Specifications

Screen size: 42-inch, 48-inch, 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch, 83-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Superbly bright screen (on most models)
+
Sleek, minimal design
+
Great connectivity and features

Reasons to avoid

-
No HDR10+
-
42- and 48-inch aren't brighter

The LG C2 OLED takes last year's already excellent mid-range OLED TV and makes it even better. It's now available in a tiny (by OLED standards) 42-inch model as well as the more familiar larger screen sizes, and its  OLED Evo technology delivers significantly improved brightness and colour. It has better colour saturation and there's a brand new processor, the Alpha A9 Gen 5. That delivers better object enhancement and dynamic tone mapping than the C1, delivering a more realistic and detailed picture. 

In our LG C2 OLED review we really struggled to find any negatives; the lack of HDR10+ support was disappointing but with HDR, HDR10 Pro, HLG and Dolby Vision all the other key standards are covered, and the vivid mode isn't very nice – although that applies to pretty much every other manufacturer's vivid mode too. The filmmaker mode is wonderful, as are the cinema and HDR cinema modes.

The only reason the C1 is currently our preferred option is because the C2 is newer, so discounting isn't really happening yet – whereas the C1 is now much cheaper than its original RRP, so you're getting much more TV for your money. This is a spectacular OLED TV, but it's also quite expensive and will remain so for a while yet.

Read the full review: LG C2 OLED

The LG G2 Gallery Series TV hanging on the wall.

(Image credit: LG)
A premium OLED TV that reaches for the light

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Outstanding contrast
+
Impressively thin design

Reasons to avoid

-
No stand included
-
Sound system struggles with bass

After something a bit more stylish? The LG G2 OLED is a knockout television that delivers a super-thin design that comes with a special flush wall mount, so it barely protrudes from the wall.

The real hero here is LG's OLED Evo technology with Brightness Booster Max, which makes this LG's brightest OLED yet – even more than the LG C2. Matched with excellent image processing, Dolby Vision HDR and – yes – four HDMI 2.1 ports, it's very well futureproofed.

The breathtakingly slim design makes it a real centerpiece television, with the contrast and color benefits of OLED pushed to new, lighting-enhanced heights. The new a9 Gen 5 AI processor is even more capable of smartly upscaling and processing onscreen objects in the most suitable way.

Watch out though: the G2 is really designed to be wall-mounted, and it doesn't come with a TV stand or feet out of the box. You can buy a floorstanding Gallery Stand alongside, or find a third-party solution for placing on a counter, though.

Read the full review: LG G2

LG Nano90 on a TV stand in a living room while someone watches it

(Image credit: LG)
The best LG TV with LED tech

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 75-inch, 86-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: LED-LCD
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Wide viewing angle support
+
Much improved black levels

Reasons to avoid

-
Backlight flickering
-
No HDR10+ support

LG's LCD TVs can have a hard time of it, given how much effort LG goes to when making its case for OLED's superiority. If you are after an LCD TV, though, the Nano90 is a capable 2020 TV that won't cost as much as the flagship CX OLED at the top of this list. In fact, you'll get 65 inches of screen on the Nano90 for less than a 48-inch CX – so there's certainly a case for LCD yet.

The arrival of HDR has been particularly challenging for IPS screens, putting even more strain on IPS’s inherent contrast controls. The Nano90’s new backlight power management system, though, truly transforms LG’s LCD HDR fortunes – despite some mild backlight flickering. 

Contrast is vastly improved over past LCD models, too – and black levels are, if not on a par with OLED, certainly still capable.

We imagine that if you’re after an LED set at this price range, you’ll probably be making the jump to a QLED in this list of the best Samsung TVs. For LG enthusiasts, though, the Nano90 is still a solid choice for your home.

Read the full review: LG Nano90

Why LG?

Why should you buy an LG TV?

A great question. With so many outstanding TV brands out there, why should you choose LG over the rest?

Panel-maker LG Display (distinct from LG Electronics, which assembles and sells LG-branded TVs) has become the poster child for today’s OLED TVs, as a major supplier to its competitors like Panasonic, Sony, or Hisense. While you may like the specific feel or features of other OLED ranges – Panasonic has a more grounded color palette, while Sony’s Acoustic Surface Audio+ technology emits sound from the panel itself – you’re still in a sense buying from LG.

LG’s OLED sets tend to have a slightly warmer ‘pop’ to colors than some competitors, but the difference is pretty small unless you’re looking for it. But what really marks it out is that it offers the cheapest OLED model on the market, the LG BX – with the exception of the Vizio OLED during some rather tempting sales periods.

OLED is able to reach deeper black levels and offer more precise light control than even the best LCD or QLED TVs, thanks to its self-emitting panels and ability to turn pixels off entirely. The TVs of degrade faster than LCDs, though, and can't go quite as bright as some new Samsung TVs. (You can suss out your preference in our OLED vs QLED comparison guide.)

The webOS smart TV platform on LG TVs is also fantastic, with a sleek and polished interface alongside good app support – and voice commands through the Magic Remote for all new OLED sets. Keep in mind, though, that LG doesn't support HDR10+, even if it has generally wide support for HDR10, Dolby Vision, and HLG formats. UK viewers won't find Freeview Play on its most recent televisions either.

Naming conventions

A man watching an LG 4K TV that is wall mounted in front of him

(Image credit: LG)

Can’t make head or tail of all those numbers and letters naming those LG TVs? We don’t blame you – the name structure can be confusing, if necessary for differentiating the huge number of old, new, and incoming sets that LG releases to market. It doesn’t help, either, that each TV maker tends to use different identifiers for their sets.

For LG’s OLED TVs, the structure is slightly easier. Something like the LG C9 OLED will be listed as “LG OLED55C9PUA” – with “LG” obviously referring to the manufacturer, “OLED” referring to the panel technology, and “55” being the model size you’re looking at (55-inch). Most sets will come in several sizes, though 55-inch is the flagship size for most new televisions these days.

Here, “C” is for the mid-range “C Series” of televisions, which sees a new model every year, alongside the budget “B Series”, stylish “E Series”, wallpaper-thin panel “W Series”, and more advanced “Z Series”.

The “9” in “LG OLED55C9” refers to the year the TV was released: 2019. That’s why LG TVs that came out in 2018 were called “C8”, “E8”, and so on. At the end of the model number are three letters marking the territory the TV is sold in: “PUA” is for North America, while “PLA” is for the UK.

LG TV Guide Cheat Sheet

Here's a quick cheat sheet for reading an LG label:

Example: LG 65SM9500PUA

1. 65: Screen size (this is a 65-inch TV)
2. SM: Indicates panel technology (S for Super UHD) and year it was made (M for 2019)
3. 9500: The number here is the series (higher is better but also more expensive typically)
4. PUA: Territory that the TV is offered in (PUA for America, PLA for UK, PTA for Australia)

LED sets work a bit differently, though. LG’s LEDs are now labelled under “NanoCell”, rather than “Super UHD”, though they’re still the LED panels LG has been making for years.

The LG NanoCell 9 Series – that “9” again referring to its 2019 release, so you know it’s up to date – is listed as “LG 65SM9500PUA”, this time leading with the model size (65-inch). That’s followed by the “S” labelling for Super UHD / NanoCell TVs, compared to “U” for simpler UHD TVs, “L” for LED TVs that aren’t 4K. LG also used to use “E” for OLED and “P” or Plasma TVs (now discontinued), though you won’t find these labels on new sets.

The second letter differentiates between each year’s new product range. So, while 2019 4K LEDs from LG all have “SM” in them, 2018’s sets had “SK” instead. 2020 will no doubt use “SN” to keep this logic going.

Nick Pino is the Senior Editor of Home Entertainment at TechRadar and covers TVs, headphones, speakers, video games, VR and streaming devices. He's written for TechRadar, GamesRadar, Official Xbox Magazine, PC Gamer and other outlets over the last decade, and he has a degree in computer science he's not using if anyone wants it.

With contributions from