This is far from a glamorous screen, and the connectivity is a weak point too; a single DVI input provides the only means (via fiddly adaptors) of connecting a digital video source, a PC, and an analogue component video source. The set sports three Scarts, a subwoofer line out, a CAM slot for adding Top Up TV, and a digital audio output.

The 32PF9967D continues Philips' currently rather confusing featurespread by using last year's Pixel Plus 2 iteration rather than the latest Pixel Plus 2 HD variant found on the 9830 models.

On the plus side, the set carries a digital tuner, backed up by the Freeview 7-day EPG, complete with direct timer event selection.

Also eye-catching is Ambilight. We've found this feature to genuinely make TV viewing more relaxing. Panel resolution is 1366 x 768. Philips claim a brightness of 600cd/m2 and contrast of 6000:1. The latter compares to a Tech Lab contrast of just 395:1.

As it transpires, the 32PF9967 has cemented itself as our preferred TV from Philips' current LCD range. What's particularly likeable is its consistency. Unlike Pixel Plus 2 HD, which can make some weaker SD sources look quite rough, this older Pixel Plus 2 can work wonders on adding detail and enhanced colours to pretty much any standarddef feeds without, crucially, introducing disruptive digital side effects.

Sure, the HD pictures on PP2 HDequipped sets are better than those of the 32PF9967 - but that's not to say that the HD pictures here are poor. In fact, they're very good, full of detail, free of noise, and benefiting from exemplary colour vibrancy and black level depth.

The 32PF9967's sonic performance isn't as consistent as its pictures, thanks to a slight shortage of bass and a slightly unnatural vocal tone.

Even with its stingy connectivity this is the best all-round proposition in Philips' current LCD range. Its pictures deliver the goods no matter what source you throw at it. John Archer