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Best computer 2022: the best PCs we've tested

PRICE
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
An Apple iMac, one of our picks for the best computer, seen from the back against a pink background.
(Image credit: Future)

If you’re looking to upgrade to the best computer, you need to make sure it checks all your boxes and that it won’t be upstaged by even the most powerful of laptops.

The best laptops have come a long way in terms of power and portability, but your desktop PC should still have an edge when compared to laptops with similar specifications.

Compared to laptops, PCs are much easier to open and upgrade so you’ll always be able to swap your tech out for the newest GPU or add more RAM if you want. Larger, traditional PC towers can also run and keep cooler for longer, even with intense workloads, so you don’t have to worry about your desktop overheating.

Secondary Keyphraseo things that don’t require high processing power like sending emails, browsing the internet or streaming movies, a budget PC should meet your needs well.

If the thought of choosing a PC tower overwhelms you, don’t worry. We’ve tested tons of desktop PCs and selected the best for this list by keeping things like budget, performance and features in mind. Whether you’re a content creator, student, gamer or streamer, we’ve narrowed down the best PC options for you. We’ve even got a convenient price comparison tool to help you find the best prices out there.

How we pick the best computer for you

Finding the best computer can be challenging since there are so many different types of desktop PCs. We look at all different kinds and compare them to other PCs in their class and consider everthing from price to performance.

Just because something is cheap doesn't mean its bad, so budget PCs need just as close an inspection as high end systems, and in all cases we consider the performance of the PC against the expected price for a product in that class.

That means a PC less than $500/£500/AU$800 won't be as powerful as the best gaming PC, but if it outperforms our expectations then it is a strong candidate for our list. Meanwhile, if a PC has best-in-class performance, if it's selling for three times what it should, we're very unlikely to recommend it to anyone since you can pay considerably less with just a slight decrease in performance.

If you want to know more about how we test and rate the computers in this guide, check out our explainer on how we test laptops and desktops to learn more.

Our picks for the best computer of 2022

Dell XPS Desktop Special Edition

(Image credit: Dell)

Best computer: Dell XPS Desktop Special Edition

Performance meets beauty and affordability

Specifications

CPU: 10th-generation Intel Core i5 – i9
Graphics: Up to NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Super
RAM: Up to 64GB DDR4 2933Mhz
Storage: Up to 2TB M.2 PCIe NVME SSD + 2TB SATA 7200RPM HDD

Reasons to buy

+
Great price
+
A lot of power
+
Beautiful white chassis

Reasons to avoid

-
Only one USB-C port

Dell’s XPS laptop line may have gone premium, price-wise, but its desktop line is still going for the trifecta – offering affordability without sacrificing performance and aesthetics. The Dell XPS Desktop Special Edition might not be a budget offering, but it remains within most people’s budgets, especially at its low- and mid-range configurations fitted with the latest innards. In fact, an Intel Core i7, RTX 3060 Ti configuration will set you back a whole lot less than its 21.5‑inch iMac equivalent while touting newer specs. Plus, it’ll look just as good in your office as it will at home.

Read our full Dell XPS Desktop Special Edition review

Alienware Aurora Ryzen Edition R10

(Image credit: Alienware)

Best gaming PC: Alienware Aurora Ryzen Edition R10

Powerful gaming for all budgets

Specifications

CPU: Up to AMD Ryzen 9 5950X
Graphics: Up to NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080
RAM: Up to 128GB 3200MHz DDR4
Storage: Up to 2TB SSD + 2TB HDD

Reasons to buy

+
Powerful specs
+
Affordable
+
Stunning design

Reasons to avoid

-
Still very expensive at highest configurations

With AMD’s solid campaign to win the CPU and GPU markets, it’s no surprise that many of the best PCs are switching over Team Red’s cause. Our favorite Alienware Aurora gaming desktop PC line is among them, fitting its R10 models with AMD’s powerful yet affordable Ryzen CPUs. Not only do these deliver brute strength when it comes to gaming, but they also tout affordability, giving budget gamers to partake in what those with souped up rigs experience everyday without burning a hole in their pockets.

Read our full Alienware Aurora Ryzen Edition R10 review

iMac (24-inch, 2021)

(Image credit: Apple)

Best all-in-one PC: iMac (24-inch, 2021)

The iMac gets a welcome redesign

Specifications

CPU: Apple M1 chip with 8‑core CPU
Graphics: Integrated 7-core – 8-core GPU
RAM: 8GB – 16GB unified memory
Screen: 24-inch 4.5K Retina display
Storage: up to 2TB

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent screen
+
Striking new design
+
Fantastic webcam

Reasons to avoid

-
Lack of ports remains
-
Mac mini may offer better value for some

If you think that the new iMacs couldn’t possibly be as good as they look, you’d be wrong. They are not just an improvement over their 21.5-inch predecessor externally, touting a fresh new face that comes in several different colors. You’ll also be happy to know that you’re getting great value here, as you’re getting the Magic Keyboard and Magic Mouse included – in matching colors, we might add. They also come with fresh new specs, rocking Apple’s new M1 chip that makes it much more powerful than the previous Intel iMacs. As far as the best computers go, the new iMac (24-inch, 2021) is the best all-in-one PC hands down. 

Read our full iMac (24-inch, 2021) review

Dell G5 Gaming Desktop

(Image credit: Dell)

Best budget gaming PC: Dell G5 Gaming Desktop

Budget PC gaming at its best

Specifications

CPU: Up to 10th Gen Intel Core i9-10900KF
Graphics: Up to NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER
RAM: Up to 64GB DDR4 2933Mhz
Storage: Up to 1TB SSD + 2TB HDD

Reasons to buy

+
Affordable
+
VR-ready configurations

Reasons to avoid

-
Base models won’t get you through the most demanding games

A unique chassis coupled with a price to beat, Dell’s latest in its G series gaming PCs is a solid contender in budget gaming. The Dell G5 boasts 9th-generation Intel chips as well as Nvidia’s most powerful gaming GTX and RTX graphics cards, starting with an i3 processor and the GTX 1650 to handle many powerful games without burning a whole in your pocket. Of course, if you’ve got more case to spare, it’s VR ready configurations are also on hand, though even those are absolutely affordable.

Lenovo Ideacentre Mini 5i

(Image credit: Lenovo)
The mini PC for mere mortals

Specifications

CPU: 10th-generation Intel Core i3 – i5
Graphics: Intel UHD Graphics 630
RAM: 8GB – 12GB DDR4
Storage: up to 1 TB 5400 HDD + 256 GB PCIe SSD

Reasons to buy

+
Solid performance for productivity and casual use
+
Space-saving design

Reasons to avoid

-
No high-end configurations available

If Apple’s Mac mini is a little above your price range, don’t worry. There are a few more affordable options out there, including Lenovo’s Ideacentre Mini 5i whose classy, minimalist exterior makes it perfect for both home and office settings. You might not be able to extensively game on this PC – though you can get away with playing less demanding games like Sayonara Wild Hearts – but for casual and work use, there’s a lot of power under its textile-covered hood. Ports abound as well and rather surprisingly for a PC its size, so you can accessorize to your heart’s content. 

Read our full Lenovo Ideacentre Mini 5i review

Corsair One i300 against a white background

(Image credit: Corsair)
For gaming and content creation

Specifications

CPU: up to 12th Gen Intel Core i9-12900K
Graphics: up to Nvidia RTX 3080 Ti
RAM: up to 64GB DDR4 2666MHz
Storage: 1 x M.2 SSD + 1 x 2.5" HDD / SSD

Reasons to buy

+
Great performance in a compact design
+
Not too loud

Reasons to avoid

-
Extremely expensive and more than you’ll ever need

The Corsair One i300 might be a bit of an overkill for most users, which is fair. That steep price of entry doesn't exactly make it accessible for everyone anyway. But, if you are looking for the best of the best in the mini PC form factor – and by that, we mean the most powerful machine you can find – then you can do better than this gorgeous piece of kit. This mini PC comes with some of the very best components money can buy, with its high-end configuration capable of handling any game at 4K and any 4K content creation workflow, allowing you to catch two fish with one worm. It’s just the ticket for gamers and video editors who need (or want) the absolute best that will last them for years to come. 

Read our full Corsair One i300 review

Lenovo Legion Tower 5i

(Image credit: Lenovo)
Plenty of power for the price

Specifications

CPU: up to 10th-gen Intel Core i7
Graphics: Up to NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060
RAM: Up to 16 GB DDR4 2933MHz
Storage: Up to 2 TB HDD + 1 TB SSD

Reasons to buy

+
Great design
+
Not a lot of bloat

Reasons to avoid

-
No USB Type-C among front ports

A well-powered machine with an affordable price might be what you need if your gaming appetite isn’t approaching the competitive sphere. Many gamers don’t really need the priciest and mightiest gaming rig, and the Lenovo Legion Tower 5i proves this, delivering plenty of power without forcing you to go broke. Nothing especially stands out with this gaming desktop, but it also offers a great gaming experience with the latest AAA titles right out of the box, which is really all that matters.

Read our full Lenovo Legion Tower 5i review

Apple Mac mini (M1, 2020)

(Image credit: Apple)
Small, but with big ambitions

Specifications

CPU: Apple M1 chip with 8-core CPU
Graphics: Integrated 8-core GPU
RAM: 8GB – 64GB unified memory
Storage: 256GB – 2TB SSD

Reasons to buy

+
Same lovely design
+
Very good performance
+
New M1 hardware has potential

Reasons to avoid

-
Can't use eGPUs

One of Apple’s biggest surprises of the year is the update to its smallest Mac. The brand-new Mac mini now touts Apple’s M1 chip, while keeping things the same in its much-loved design. It’s more powerful than ever – with more than decent video editing performance, even at 8K, and can now run iOS apps and games, thanks to this new chip, but it still keeps its title as the cheapest Mac ever – terrific news for budget-minded Apple fans looking for the best computer.

Read our full Mac mini (M1, 2020) review

Intel Compute Stick

(Image credit: Intel)

Best stick PC: Intel Compute Stick

The tiny computer that can

Specifications

CPU: Intel Atom – Intel Core m5
Graphics: : Intel HD Graphics – Intel HD Graphics 515
RAM: 1GB – 4GB
Storage: 8GB-64GB eMMC

Reasons to buy

+
Wide CPU choices
+
Extremely portable design

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited fan cooling
-
Limited RAM and storage

Some people have issues with desktop PCs, as they’re often rather bulky. The Intel Core Compute Stick has made that irrelevant. Looking more like a thumb drive than an actual computer, this tiny renegade can connect to any monitor with an HDMI input. Its base starts with a lowly 1.33GHz Intel Atom processor running Linux, but can be configured up to an Intel Core m5 processor. This is one of the best PCs, but one that you can literally slip in your pocket, whether you need to get some work done during your daily commute or squeeze in some PC time while you’re traveling.

Lenovo Yoga A940

(Image credit: Lenovo)

Best in features: Lenovo Yoga A940

Thoughtful design, innovative features

Specifications

CPU: 8th-generation Intel Core i7-8700
Graphics: AMD Radeon RX 560 4GB
RAM: 32GB
Storage: 1 TB 5400 RPM + 256 GB PCIe SSD
Screen: 27" 4K UHD (3840 x 2160) IPS Multi-touch 100% Adobe RGB

Reasons to buy

+
Good price
+
Some nice features

Reasons to avoid

-
Older components

As a designer, if you don’t fall in love with Lenovo Yoga A940’s thoughtful design, then we don’t know what will. This innovative all-in-one desktop boasts a stunning 27-inch 4K UHD display with up to 25-degree tilt, pen support and a rotating hinge for stability. It’s full of impressive features as well, like the Lenovo Precision Dial that you can attach on the left or right side of the hinge, whatever feels most comfortable for you and your process. And, unlike the best Macs, it offers 100% Adobe RGB support, an LED light at the bottom of the screen and even wireless smartphone charging. If you’re a content creator or designer, and you’re looking for an AIO that allows you a truly seamless workflow, this is the best computer for you.

Read our full Lenovo Yoga A940 review

Mac Studio computer on white background

(Image credit: Apple)
A compact Mac for creative professionals

Specifications

CPU: Apple 10-core M1 Max or 20-core M1 Ultra
Graphics: Integrated 24-core - 32-core (M1 Max) or 48-core - 64-core (M1 Ultra) GPU
RAM: 32GB – 128GB unified memory
Storage: 512GB – 8TB SSD
Dimensions (H x W x D): 9.5 x 19.7 x 19.7 cm

Reasons to buy

+
Compact
+
Powerful

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricey
-
Non-upgradable

The new Mac Studio is like a super-charged Mac mini for content creators, and is currently the best PC you can buy if you're a creative professional. Not only is this an impressively compact computer, it also comes packing some serious power thanks to a choice of the M1 Max chip, or the brand-new uber-powerful M1 Ultra. 

The level of performance on offer here will be overkill for many people, but if you're looking for a workstation PC for heavy creative workloads, such as editing 8K footage or rendering complex 3D scenes and animations, then the Mac Studio will be a great choice. It's expensive, but worth the investment.

Read the full Apple Mac Studio review

Raspberry Pi 4 Model B

(Image credit: Raspberry Pi)

Best single-board computer: Raspberry Pi 4 Model B

Small yet mighty

Specifications

CPU: Broadcom BCM2711, Quad core Cortex-A72 (ARM v8)
Graphics: OpenGL ES 3.0
RAM: 1GB, 2GB or 4GB LPDDR4-3200 SDRAM

Reasons to buy

+
More powerful CPU for a smoother user experience
+
The 4GB RAM model is almost a desktop replacement

Reasons to avoid

-
Even at idle the CPU gets rather too warm

Despite its tiny size – it’s so small, it doesn’t even have its own chassis, the Raspberry Pi boards have proven themselves to be utterly capable little machines, surprisingly capable of handling everyday productivity tasks like word processing and spreadsheets. And, with the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B, we see this powerful computer getting the fantastic update it rightly deserves. Finally, the Raspberry Pi line gives you a desktop computer and a platform to experiment and create.

Read our full Raspberry Pi 4 Model B review

How to buy the best computer for your needs and budget

Which computer configuration is best?

The best computer configuration will depend on what you’re using your PC for. You need to pay attention to the CPU, GPU, hard drive and SSDs, and RAM in your tower because each individual aspect needs to be changed for the optimal computer configuration. 

If you’re using your desktop PC for everyday tasks, you won’t need a high-powered CPU or GPU and the standard SSD and RAM will do just fine. Gaming PC towers, however, will need those high-power CPUs and GPUs as well as lots of hard drive and SSD storage to account for high-resolution gaming.

Which is the best computer brand?

The best computer brand depends on what your PC’s functionality is and what you use it for. Dell and Lenovo make great everyday use computers if you like Windows operating systems, but Apple also has great desktop computers if you’re able to afford how expensive they can be.

On the other hand, if you want a PC that has gaming capabilities, you’ll want to look at brands like Lenovo, Corsair, Dell, or even Alienware if you’re looking for the highest quality gaming PC. 

Many computer brands have the best PCs that are top-quality and affordable, so the best computer brand for you will ultimately depend on what you want your PC to accomplish.

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Michelle Rae Uy is the Buying Guides Editor here at TechRadar. She's a Los Angeles-based tech, travel and lifestyle writer covering a wide range of topics, from computing to the latest in green commutes to the best hiking trails. She's an ambivert who enjoys communing with nature and traveling for months at a time just as much as watching movies and playing sim games at home. That also means that she has a lot more avenues to explore in terms of understanding how tech can improve the different aspects of our lives.