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The Sony XH95 is the Sony 4K TV to buy this year (if you're not sold on OLED)

(Image credit: Sony)
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This year's Sony TV to get is finally on the market. The Sony XH95, the company's flagship 4K HDR TV for 2020, is now available to buy, starting at £1,199 / $999 for its smallest 49-inch size.

With five different model sizes there are plenty of options too, with a 55-inch model costing £1,599 / $1,399, a 65-inch model costing £1,999 / $1,999, a 75-inch model costing (a considerably higher) £3,199 / $3,499, and even an 85-inch model priced at £3,999 / $4,499.

Sound expensive? It is. But the Sony XH95 packs in the best of Sony's TV technology, with an X1 Ultimate processor and support for both Dolby Vision HDR and Dolby Atmos audio, as well as discreet feet at the edges of the screen to keep your eyes focused on the action.

The release of the XH95 comes a matter of weeks after its cheaper siblings – the XH81, XH80 and X70 – hit the market, all of which use the standard X1 Processor, rather than the X1 Ultimate chip used in the XH95.

The cheapest of the three (X70) starts at just £599 for its 43-inch size, too. If you're after a bargain, there are certainly more cost-effective Sony TVs out there – but the XH95 should pack in more premium features, if you care about that.

Just don't pay too much attention to the Netflix Calibrated Mode touted by Sony and others – it won't do much to improve your viewing experience, and getting a good panel is more important than a particular picture setting.

After a really premium Sony TV? Check out this OLED deal below:

Sounds like screen spirit

Something Sony does quite differently from the competition is its TVs' built-in audio, using its Acoustic Surface+ Audio to literally vibrate sound out of the panel itself, rather than relying on just traditional drivers. 

The jury's out on whether this makes for good sound overall, but it has some uses – including the Sound-from-Picture Reality feature on the XH95, which enables it to more accurately locate audio output to its source onscreen (a mouth speaking, a car exploding, or otherwise).

The best audio will come only at certain sizes, though – the 49-inch and 85-inch models won't get the beefed-up X-Balanced Speaker unit, while the 49-inch will miss out on the separate channel controls of Acoustic Multi-Audio.

Henry is a freelance technology journalist. Before going freelance, he spent more than three years at TechRadar reporting on TVs, projectors and smart speakers as the website's Home Cinema Editor – and has been interviewed live on both BBC World News and Channel News Asia, discussing the future of transport and 4K resolution televisions respectively. As a graduate of English Literature and persistent theatre enthusiast, he'll usually be found forcing Shakespeare puns into his technology articles, which he thinks is what the Bard would have wanted. Bylines also include Edge, T3, and Little White Lies.