Update: Moto 360 made a cameo at Google IO, but its official price and release date did not. On Page 1, we revised the specs. On Page 2, Motorola hints at the launch price.

The Moto 360 watch is the circular wonder that runs Android Wear, Google's software designed to work on all sorts of wearables starting with smartwatches.

It's not another wearable with a square-shaped display like the LG G Watch and Samsung Gear Live. No, this Google watch ditches the computerized boxy design seen in the Pebble Steel and Samsung Gear 2.

It does have two sharp downsides, though: it's not out yet and the price hasn't been officially confirmed. The release date was rumored to be July but, curiously, it wasn't demoed at Google IO.

In fact, despite Motorola's vague "summer" release date in the US, it hasn't even been shown working in video. It's been turned off and at a distance in developer videos and turned on in still photos.

Paired with customizable leather and metal straps that fit variety-seeking 21 century wrists, the ambitious Moto 360 is shaping up to be Google's answer to the inevitable Apple iWatch. It just has to get here on time.

Moto 360 watch face and battery life

The computerized Moto 360 watch screen is rumored to be a custom-made OLED display, which would make sense given its circular shape and need to conserve battery life.

OLEDs consume as much as 40% less power when displaying black images vs LCDs because they can turn off individual pixels. The opposite is true for battery-draining white backgrounds.

Moto 360 watch face screen
Presumed to include OLED display technology

This could be why almost all Moto 360 renders exhibit a black analog watch face when Android Wear menus are inactive. The timepiece could easily throw up a black analog dial "screensaver."

Such a power-saving move would make the Moto 360 look and act even more like a traditional watch and give it an always-on screen, a feature that's also been confirmed for the rival LG G Watch.

Motorola perfected a similar active display on its Moto X smartphone, which always includes the time and notifications on the lock screen, and it could do the same here. Battery life is even more important on a wearable; no one wants to charge a watch before the day is out.