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This is the cheapest 3D printer in the world right now

When they first hit the scene, 3D printers were hailed as the future of printing. Fast forward to 2020 and the reality is a little different; while makers and DIY fanatics have firmly embraced 3D printing, the rest of us still consider the pursuit a little too pricey.

Easythreed X1 mini 3D printer - $89.99 at Gearbest

Easythreed X1 mini 3D printer - $89.99 at Gearbest
(£78.76/AU$149.14)
3D printers are becoming cheaper and cheaper by the week it seems, and this device from Easythreed is the cheapest of them all. Don't expect it to perform miracles, but if you want to dip your toes into the world of 3D printing, look no further.

Easythreed is trying to change all that with its X1 mini portable FDM 3D printer.  Available for just $89.99 (£78.76/AU$149.14) using coupon code GBETDX1A, it is the cheapest 3D printer out there right now.

Gearbest ships to most territories worldwide via expedited shipping, although you may be levied additional charges and fees by customs. Exact prices will also vary region by region depending on the day’s exchange rate.

The machine comes with its own slicing software called Easyware and has a printing speed of up to 24cm per minute. It uses filament up to a diameter of 1.75mm and can build items up to 100x100x100mm.

Bear in mind...

If this product comes from mainland China, it will take at least a month to reach either the US or the UK (and potentially more). You may be levied a tax either directly or through the courier. 

Have you managed to get hold of a cheaper product with equivalent specifications, in stock and brand new? Let us know and we'll tip our hat to you.

While the X1's printing accuracy (up to 0.2mm) might put some users off, its simple assembly, one-click printing and quirky design make it an attractive proposition. 

Don’t expect it to work miracles, though. It's designed primarily for prototyping and rough 3D modelling - and, of course, affordability.

Desire Athow

Managing Editor, TechRadar Pro

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Then followed a weekly tech column in a local business magazine in Mauritius, a late night tech radio programme called Clicplus and a freelancing gig at the now-defunct, Theinquirer, with the legendary Mike Magee as mentor. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global techfests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. He has an affinity for anything hardware and staunchly refuses to stop writing reviews of obscure products or cover niche B2B software-as-a-service providers.