Best printers for Mac in 2024

PRICE
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
VERDICT
REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID

Looking for the best printers for Mac and MacBook laptops? If you're struggling to find a compatible printer for your Apple device, you've come to the right place. 

We've tested over 200 of the best printers and best small business printers - and these are our top choice inkjets and lasers and for Apple users. Whether you're looking for color accuracy for photos and design, or a business-ready machine for high-volume document printing, you'll find plenty of options that play nicely with Macs. 

Our team of expert reviewers have gone hands-on with over two-hundred of the top printers from Epson, Canon, and HP, testing print speeds, resolution, and text and image print quality on standard and glossy photo paper. As part of our review process, we explore essential features such as the automatic document feeder, double-sided printing, and all-in-one functions like scanning and copying. Alongside this, we check all port and connectivity options, including the ability to wirelessly print from your iPhone or iPad, to identify the best printers for Mac and MacBooks. 


Reader offer: Save $5 on Brother MFC-J1170DW Wireless Color Inkjet All-in-One Printer

Reader offer: Save $5 on Brother MFC-J1170DW Wireless Color Inkjet All-in-One Printer

The inkjet printer comes equipped with two-sided printing, rapid inkjet speed (17 ppm black, 16.5 ppm color), and a 2.7” color touchscreen for easy navigation. Suitable for mobile printing. Use code Save5Bucks.

Preferred partner (What does this mean?) 

Best Mac printer overall

HP OfficeJet Pro 9025e printer during our review process

(Image credit: HP)
Our top choice for printing from Apple devices

Specifications

Category: Inkjet color all-in-one
Print Speed: 22ppm (mono)
Paper Sizes: Up to A4
Paper Capacity: 500 sheets
Conectivity: USB, Ethernet, Wireless

Reasons to buy

+
Pretty fast (printing and scanning)
+
Apps works well
+
Clean, likable design
+
Front USB
+
500-page tray capacity
+
Instant Ink compatible

Reasons to avoid

-
No NFC
-
Smaller display
-
More expensive than the competition
-
Smart Tasks don’t sync

The HP OfficeJet Pro 9025 all-in-one printer is our pick for the best overall printer for Mac. This printer has wireless printing including AirPrint for an enhanced printing experience with Mac (and Apple products in general), has an app for remote management, and is large enough to handle a large volume of printing while not taking up a ton of space. 

While not a photo printer, we found that this printer was quite efficient in printing office documents, with first-page output coming in at 7 seconds and five pages printed in 22 seconds. 

However, when we pushed the print resolution to maximum and selected 'best with photos' there was a dramatic slowdown. The first page didn’t come out till the 91st second. We had to wait a whole 4:15 minutes for four pages to be printed. The printer also surprised us with how noisy it was. Standing next to the printer, noise levels reached up to 64dB. We know - we measured it. 

Print quality is good for standard office use. Although we wouldn't recommend it for high-quality images. We had issues when using normal paper on default, where photos had some banding and looked slightly muddied. At max resolution, the result was not much better, due to the intrinsic nature of office print paper. 

As an all-in-one, we also checked out the scanning capabilities. Using the HP Smart app, we scanned our sample set of documents in 156 seconds. That's really good. Scanning quality, though,  we found to be adequate. 

If that's not an issue for you, there's a lot to like here. The OfficeJet Pro 9025 also has a built-in touchscreen, it is energy efficient and ENERGY STAR certified, and it can print on various paper types (such as plain paper, photo paper, and glossy paper).

Read our full HP OfficeJet Pro 9025e review

Best home printer for Mac

HP ENVY Inspire 7200e/7220e unboxed

(Image credit: Future)
A great pick for your home or home office

Specifications

Category: Inkjet color 3-in-1
Print Speed: 15ppm (mono)
Paper Sizes: Up to A4
Paper Capacity: 125 sheets
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi Direct, Bluetooth, USB

Reasons to buy

+
Strong photo print quality
+
Bluetooth & dual-band Wi-Fi
+
Separate photo paper tray
+
Color touchscreen interface

Reasons to avoid

-
Small and costly cartridges
-
Auto duplex is slow
-
Very little bundled ink

The HP Envy Inspire 7200e (US) / Inspire 7220e (UK) is a superb home printer for Mac  and MacBook users. That's thanks to its wireless connectivity options, the ability to work with AirPrint, and some useful features like auto-duplex and a sharp color touchscreen.

In our testing, we found that the printer handled standard document printing with ease. We had absolutely no complaints with the print quality. Monochrome pages, even in small fonts, were crisp and dark, without over-inking. Photo print quality was equally great. Our full color printouts were absolutely vibrant (that's down to to HP’s vivid dye-based inks). Better still, they looked best on glossy photo paper. 

Our tests showed the Mac-compatible printer also made decent digital copies. Unlike the HP Envy Inspire 7900e, there's no no automatic document feed (ADF) and no dual scan mode. However, we did find there was very little loss of detail. The scan and print resolution of 1,200 x 1,200dpi is respectable, but we did notice some variation in the color of each photocopy. 

On the downside, print speeds were slightly slow, especially in auto-duplex mode, and there's not much room for paper despite the printer's size. Our biggest issue, however, is the potentially high running costs. The printer doesn't come with much ink out of the box, and cartridges are expensive. 

Factored in, there's still a lot to like about the HP Envy Inspire 7200e / 7220e. While Mac computers (iMac, MacBook, Mac Mini, Mac Studio, Mac Pro) can print wirelessly to most printers, the fact that this printer has AirPrint means that the compatibility between Apple devices and the printer is enhanced. Apple devices can print without needing extra drivers and have a wide range of printing options natively.

Read our full HP Envy Inspire 7200e / 7220e review

Best budget printer for Mac

Brother DCP-J1200W on a wooden desk in front of a brick wall, a plant to the right

(Image credit: Future)
Basic printer with lots of ink

Specifications

Category: Inkjet color 3-in-1
Print Speed: 16 ppm (mono)
Paper Sizes: Up to A4
Paper Capacity: 150 sheets
Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi Direct, USB

Reasons to buy

+
Minimal off-white design
+
Good all-round print quality
+
Plenty of ink in the box, high yield cartridges available
+
Excellent companion app

Reasons to avoid

-
No USB Host or Ethernet ports
-
No LCD or ADF
-
No auto duplex mode

If you're working to a tighter budget, the Brother MFC-J1205W (US) / DCP-J1200W (UK) is a solid no-frills three-in-one printer that's not bad, not great, but good at what it does. 

Right out of the box, we found it came with enough ink for 720 black and white pages, or 480 colour pages. It's one of the main draws here: the INKVestment tanks - a sort of halfway house between traditional inkjet printing and refillable ink tanks. This is the most compact of Brother's eco-tank-type models, and that comes at some cost. 

Connectivity is made via USB or Wi-Fi (AirPrint is supported). But this is a lower-end Mac printer, so while we expected some cuts to features and ports, we did feel it's missing a great deal of them. There's no front USB Host port, no Ethernet port. Features-wise, there's no ADF, no LCD, and no auto duplex mode. And they're sorely missed - particularly that last one. The lack of touchscreen did make it trickier for us to use the printer, but the existing control panel is simple enough and the companion app is excellent.      

The printer performed without a hitch during all our tests. Printing, scanning, and copying were all easy, all successful. We did discover it's not the fastest printer in the world. It took even longer than Brother's own estimates. 

However, print quality overall was very good. Print resolution is a respectable 3600 x 1200 dpi when printing from a Mac, which is slightly lower compared to PC. In text documents, the words were crisp and dark without smearing even at very small point sizes. Printing photos to glossy photo paper, results were satisfactory - it can't compete with the vivid imagery offered by photo printers, but for a business-oriented model, it’s impressive. 

If you don't mind missing out on a few features, the Brother MFC-J1205W / DCP-J1200W performs admirably as a basic budget printer. 

Read our full Brother MFC-J1205W / DCP-J1200W review

Best photo printer for Mac

Epson EcoTank ET-8550 on a wooden desk with refillable ink tanks in front of it

(Image credit: Future)
Excellent picture quality for printing images and graphics

Specifications

Category: Inkjet
Print Speed: 32 ppm (mono A4)
Paper Sizes: Up to A3+
Paper Capacity: 100 sheets (main tray)
Connectivity: Ethernet, Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi Direct, USB

Reasons to buy

+
Refillable ink tanks
+
Excels at photos
+
Supports up to A3+ paper sizes
+
Supports AirPrint 

Reasons to avoid

-
High initial cost
-
Slow duplex and color printing

The Epson EcoTank ET-8550 is a Mac printer that absolutely excels at printing photographs - and even supports A3+ paper printing for broader canvases. 

It's not the only reason we like this unit. The EcoTank in the name means the printer has an ink tank. So, because it's refillable, there's less waste, lower running costs, and higher ink capacity than traditional printers. 

Chiefly aimed at home users, we found the 3-in-1 ET-8550 very easy to use with the intuitive 10.9cm touchscreen that lets you preview tasks before printing. It offered a generous range of features like scanning and auto-duplex mode, the ability to enlarge photocopies from A4 to A3. We even managed printing 2m banners via the rear tray. So, as expected, it easily handled the basics: sticky labels, thick card, blank CDs. However, it is missing an ADF and fax capabilities. 

Connectivity is well-serviced, with options for Ethernet and Wi-Fi, including Wi-Fi Direct and Apple AirPrint. There's also a MicroSD card reader - useful for photographers. We experienced now issues connecting via these methods, but we did feel it lacking without Bluetooth or NFC. Elsewhere, paper capacity isn't great either, holding 80 to 100 A4 sheets. 

Print speeds are great for standard A4 documents. But it slows down in auto-duplex mode, and it's worse when printing in color. But the wait is worth it. With the printer prioritizing quality over speed, the optimised print resolution of 5760 x 1400 dpi really shows - and it's very impressive. In all of our tests, the Epson EcoTank ET-8550 performed well, but its real strength is in printing finely detailed photos on glossy photo paper

Read our full Epson EcoTank ET-8550 review

Best printers for Mac: FAQs

Can you use a regular printer with a MacBook?

It depends. Most of the top printers have no issue connecting to any of the best MacBook Pros, MacBooks, and Macs. However, Apple devices are often low on port selection. So, wireless printing facilities remain the easiest way to print from a regular printer to a MacBook or MacBook Pro. If in doubt, look for a printer that clearly states support for AirPrint, 

Will any wireless printer work with MacBook?

Yes, all the best wireless printers will work with MacBook and MacBook Pro devices. These printers allow Wi-Fi- and Bluetooth printing - but most importantly, they support Apple AirPrint. This Apple tech lets you easily print without the need for drivers to Mac, MacBook, iPad, and iPhones. Check the specs to see if it's enabled on your printer. 

Why is there no Apple printer?

With Apple's track record, we've no doubt the company could design and build a beautiful, fast, accurate printer for Macs and MacBooks. But it's unlikely to happen any time soon. 

Printer manufacturers don't make much money selling printers. The real income is through the continuous supply of ink cartridges, toners, and bottles. It's a lot like video game consoles, which don't make much if any profit. The profit is made from the games and licenses. 

So, while Apple may want to enter the printer market, it has no desire to enter the ink market - and that's likely why there is no Apple printer. For now, at least. 

How do I know if my printer is AirPrint-compatible?

Most modern wireless printers support Apple AirPrint, which lets you quickly connect and print from desktop and mobile Apple devices.

But to be sure, you can see the full list of AirPrint-enabled devices on Apple's support page by clicking here

How to choose the best printer for Mac for you

When it comes to choosing the Mac printer that's best for you, there are few key features to look out for and, like any tech, some considerations to make. You generally have two choices here, between the best inkjet printers and the best laser printers

Inkjet models are good all-rounders and favored for photo printing, while laser models tend to excel at crisp text reproduction for high-volume document printing. 

Digging deeper into how you'll use your Mac printer, consider how often you'll need to use the printer. If it is to satisfy many users in an office, you'll need something much more robust than the best home printers or the best portable printers, which excel at servicing a single user.

Certain businesses may have more unique needs - for example, a requirement for the best printers for T-shirts, or the best large format printers for creating eye-catching posters. The best photo printers aren't always the ideal choice for printing a lot of text documents. So identifying the use is essential.

By the same token, consider the space you have available to house your new printer, and what other functionality you'll be expecting from it. You can find AIO printing units easily capable of handling scan, copy, and even fax capabilities. Decide which of these - if any - you intend to make use of. Finally, consider additional touches like look and feel, which may be particularly important for those keen to ensure their printer doesn't stick out like a sore thumb in an otherwise smart home office.

It's also worth considering which Apple devices you intend to use. While wired printers will be fine some certain Mac and MacBook computers, you may need a wireless printer for some models for best results. 

Have a preferred brand? We’ve tested, reviewed, and rated the best HP printers, the best Epson printers, and the best Brother printers.  

How we test the best printers for Mac

Our team of expert reviewers have tested out a wide range of printers for the home and office. Our experience includes the best all-in-one printers the best ink tank printers, and even the best sublimation printers

But whether we're comparing the specs of the fastest printers or assessing the merits of printers designed to work flawlessly with an Apple Mac or MacBook, we undertake the same rigorous testing process.

Printers these days do more than just print onto paper, so it's only right that we've tested all of the features and functions of the products featured on this list of best printers for Mac.

Having said that, just as smartphones should still be able to make phone calls, we've ensured that the printers on this list can still execute their number one role. That means testing print speeds, paper sizes, and paper capacity.

After that, we've compared other functions like scanning, copying, and even faxing, while additional factors like touchscreen displays, size and weight, and aesthetics have also been analyzed.

In the business world, where the wire is an increasingly unwelcome figure, connectivity is of the utmost importance, so we've also run the rule over the Wi-Fi, AirPrint, and Ethernet options on these printers. Finally, we've also noted the costs of each printer, incorporating both the initial outlay and also the general running costs (.e.g ink) of each.

You can find out more in guide How we test printers at TechRadar Pro

Steve Clark
B2B Editor - Creative & Hardware

Steve is TechRadar Pro’s B2B Editor for Creative & Hardware. He explores the apps and devices for individuals and organizations that thrive on design and innovation. A former journalist at Web User magazine, he's covered software and hardware news, reviews, features, and guides. He's previously worked on content for Microsoft, Sony, and countless SaaS & product design firms. Once upon a time, he wrote commercials and movie trailers. Relentless champion of the Oxford comma.

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