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Best wireless printers of 2022

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REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
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Best wireless printers

The best wireless printers allow you to print from any device without having to directly connect via USB or Ethernet, making it easier to print from your PC, laptop, or smartphone, great for folks looking for seamless printing ahead of the busy back to school season.

With many of us still embracing hybrid working, having untethered connectivity on a printer is now a must-have feature, allowing more than one computer to connect and print from a device.

All of the wireless printers in this guide come with either Wi-Fi or Bluetooth connectivity (and often both), which makes them incredibly flexible devices that are easy to install in any home or modern office. 

Some even add NFC (near field communication) connectivity for tap-to-connect convenience with compatible mobile clients.

Because they don't need to be connected to a PC or router with wires, you can place them pretty much anywhere - as long as there's a power socket and decent Wi-Fi connection. Of course, it also means you can print from any device and from anywhere that connects with your printer.

By being connected to your network - albeit without wires- the best wireless printers benefit from advanced network features as well. If you have a small network, for example, every PC connected to your network can print to them, making them ideal for businesses. Many even allow you to scan and email documents directly from the wireless printer itself.

So, we've put together a list of the best wireless printers currently available, alongside our own price comparison tool so you’re also getting the best available deal.

We've compared these wireless printers across various points, like their printing speed, printing quality, running costs, design, and build quality. We also looked at how well they print images and texts, and their overall cost-effectiveness, among other things.

And if you're looking for something a little extra, do check out our pick of the best home printers and the best cheap printers around today.


The best wireless printers of 2022 in full

Best wireless printers: HP OfficeJet Pro 8035e

(Image credit: HP)
True wireless printer that works with Alexa

Specifications

Category: All-in-one color inkjet printer
Print speed: 29ppm (mono)
Paper sizes: up to A4
Paper capacity: 225 sheets
Weight: 8.2kg

Reasons to buy

+
Works with Alexa
+
Strong wireless connectivity

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive cartridges

The HP OfficeJet Pro 8035e (known as OfficeJet Pro 8025 in the UK) looks slick with its blue detailing and small enough to sit on a desk in a home office. It is also has excellent wireless connectivity with self-healing Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi Direct and Bluetooth all built in. This makes it particularly easy to connect a mobile device for cloud printing using AirPrint, or Google Cloud Print. 

You can even yell at your printer to make it work thanks to its compatibility with Alexa voice commands. With a fairly fast print speed, a large paper tray and user-friendly touchscreen controls, there’s a lot to like about this competent all-in-one. 

The printer has a monolithic, white/dark gray design with sharp edges, and it's close to 39% smaller than its predecessor. 

Read the full review: HP OfficeJet Pro 8025

Best wireless printers: Brother MFC-J5330DW

(Image credit: Brother)
High capacity inkjet with Wi-Fi and A3 skills

Specifications

Category: 4-in-1 colour inkjet printer
Print speed: 22ppm
Paper sizes: up to A3
Paper capacity: 300
Weight: 16.9kg

Reasons to buy

+
Can print up to A3
+
High paper capacity

Reasons to avoid

-
A4-size scanner
-
Slower than a laser 

With all the functionality a small business could need, this feature-packed inkjet can do anything from sending a fax, to saving a scan to the cloud. Most surprisingly, given its A4-size footprint, is its ability to print on A3 paper. 

The Brother MFC-J5330DW has a deep 250-page A4 paper tray, a rapid 22 ppm churn rate, and duplex printing capabilities—all within a reasonable budget. 

Wi-Fi is built in and Brother’s companion iOS/Android app makes wireless printing a breeze. It prints clearly in monochrome, while colour photos look quite vibrant on photo paper. 

The touchscreen is rather small, and it’s not as fast as a laser printer, but it strikes a good balance between performance and features. And for those who prefer everything well organized, the printer comes with neat internal cable management. 

Read the full review: Brother MFC-J5330DW

Epson EcoTank ET-2803 (ET-2856 in the UK)

(Image credit: Epson)

3. Epson EcoTank ET-2803 (ET-2856 in the UK)

Entry-level EcoTank that's fully wireless

Specifications

Category: All-in-one color inkjet
Print speed: 10ppm (mono)
Paper sizes: up to A4
Paper capacity: 100
Weight: 5.4kg

Reasons to buy

+
Low running cost
+
Lots of ink in the box

Reasons to avoid

-
No Ethernet port
-
No USB Host port

This is one of Epson’s most affordable EcoTank models and yet it’s not short on features. It can scan, copy and print automatically on both sides of the page (auto duplex). You can load the main tray with up to 100 sheets of A4, or whatever envelopes, card, or photopaper you want to print on. 

You can also fill up the four 70ml ink tanks using the bundled ink bottles and print up to 14,000 mono and 5,200 color pages. There’s no Ethernet port on this stripped back budget model, but that’s not a problem when you have Wi-Fi with Wi-Fi Direct and AirPrint available for making a fully wireless connection with your Mac, PC or mobile device.

The EcoTank ET-2803 is fairly slow when printing at full resolution, but it can operate at faster printing speeds (up to 33ppm) in draft mode. 

Best wireless printers: HP Envy Pro 6420

(Image credit: Future)
A small business printer with added Bluetooth

Specifications

Category: All-in-one color inkjet printer
Print speed: 10ppm (mono)
Paper sizes: up to A4
Paper capacity: 100 sheets
Weight: 6.16kg

Reasons to buy

+
Space saving design
+
Strong wireless connectivity

Reasons to avoid

-
Slow print speed
-
Wasteful tri-color cartridge

The HP Envy Pro 6420 is a compact and inexpensive inkjet with all the features you could ask for from a home office printer. It can print, scan, copy and even fax via your smartphone. The print speed is slow, but it can auto duplex print or photocopy a stack of up to 35 pages with its inbuilt ADF (automatic document scanner). 

Instead of an Ethernet port, you have both Bluetooth and self-healing Wi-Fi built in, making mobile printing via HP’s iOS/Android app particularly easy.  

The HP Envy Pro 6420 prints quietly, and instead of beeping continuously when the printing is done, it plays a gentle notification sound. The main input tray has a limited paper capacity of 100 A4 sheets, or ten envelopes, or 40 sheets of photo paper. But the output capacity is more limited (25 sheets). 

Read the full review: HP Envy Pro 6420

Best wireless printers: Canon Pixma TS6250

(Image credit: Canon)

5. Canon PIXMA TS6220 (TS6250 in the UK)

Bluetooth home printer with all-round appeal

Specifications

Category: colour inkjet 3-in-1 printer
Print speed: 36ppm
Paper sizes: A3
Paper capacity: 300
Weight: 40kg

Reasons to buy

+
Compact A3 printing
+
Masses of features

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive  
-
No touchscreen   

This satisfyingly small and attractively designed all-in-one inkjet offers everything you are likely to need in your home office. It can print and scan at a high enough resolution to provide crisp and accurate colour photocopies using five inkjet cartridges instead of the usual four. 

The extra one is a pigment black, for more durable mono prints. It is also blessed with a touchscreen interface and not only Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi Direct connectivity, but Bluetooth as well. 

The Pixma TS6220 holds 100 sheets in its front tray (output) and 100 sheets in its rear tray (input). The input tray can also hold 20 sheets of photo paper. The printer supports smart assistants, like Alexa and the Google Home Assistant, so you can simply give voice commands and have your printer print hands-free. Commands could include printing Gmail attachments, documents from cloud storage platforms, and images from social media sites. 

Best wireless printers: Epson WorkForce WF-7210DTW

(Image credit: Epson)
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Affordable wireless A3 printer with Wi-Fi and NFC

Specifications

Category: colour inkjet printer
Print speed: 18ppm (mono)
Paper sizes: A3
Paper capacity: 500
Weight: 15.5kg

Reasons to buy

+
Duplex A3 printing
+
High paper capacity

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited ink capacity   
-
No front USB port   

Duplex A3 printing is not something many affordable inkjet printers can manage, but this capable device does it well and it can hold a whole ream of paper in its dual paper trays. It also boasts Wi-Fi Direct and NFC connectivity for making a quick wireless connection and printing via your smartphone. 

It is a pity the supplied Epson Durabright startup ink cartridges are rather limiting, but when you switch to XL capacity replacements it becomes a bit more economical to run. It certainly has a high capacity for paper with room for a whole ream on board.

The WorkForce WF-7210DTW is quite large and you will require plenty of desk space to accommodate it. You will also want enough clearance above since it is over 300mm high.

Read the full review: Epson WorkForce WF-7210DTW

Best wireless printers: Brother MFC-L8690CDW

(Image credit: Jim Hill)
Prompt printing and scanning in a multitalented MDF

Specifications

Category: 4-in-1 colour laser MFD
Print speed: 31ppm
Paper sizes: up to A4
Paper capacity: 300
Weight: 27.9kg

Reasons to buy

+
Fast print speed   
+
Easy cloud printing

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive 
-
Heavy and bulky

Brother has endowed this hefty laser printer with all the features a small business might need. It can hold 300 sheets of paper and turn out mono or colour pages at the rate of 31 per minute. There’s a fax facility and electronic document feed for automated tasks. 

It also makes wireless printing from a mobile device, or scanning documents to the cloud very easy using its built in Wi-Fi and a slick iOS/Android companion app. Both Google Cloud Cloud and AirPrint are covered.

Although this printer does not handle A3 paper and lacks NFC connectivity without buying the optional dongle, it is very well featured in other aspects. You have touchscreen control via a large 9.3cm LCD, duplex printing, and Wi-Fi Direct control through an impressive companion app. 

Read the full review: Brother MFC-L8690CDW 

Best wireless printers: HP LaserJet Pro M15w

(Image credit: HP)
Pint-size wireless laser printer for the micro office

Specifications

Category: mono laser printer
Print speed: 19ppm
Paper sizes: up to A4
Paper capacity: 100
Weight: 3.8kg

Reasons to buy

+
World’s smallest  
+
Wi-fi built in

Reasons to avoid

-
No duplex printing
-
No display

Laser printers tend to be a lot larger than their inkjet cousins, but HP has turned that on its head with this toaster-sized device. It can only print single-side mono pages, but it can do it more quickly and economically than most inkjets and it’s small enough to carry around with you. 

You can connect via Wi-Fi, or Wi-Fi direct for wireless printing via AirPrint, or Google Cloud Print. The slick iOS/Android app by HP can help you with this, but note that there's no LCD display. 

HP has aimed this compact printer for the micro home office. The input and output trays fold away to make the printer's footprint just a bit larger than an A4 sheet's, and its height is around the same as an average smartphone. You can expect the HP LaserJet Pro M15w to print a thousand documents consistently and swiftly on a single toner cartridge.

Read the full review: HP LaserJet Pro M15w 

Best wireless printers: HP Deskjet 3630

(Image credit: HP)
Wireless printing on a budget

Specifications

Category: 3-in-1 colour inkjet printer
Print speed: 20ppm
Paper sizes: up to A4
Paper capacity: 500
Weight: 12.1kg

Reasons to buy

+
Instant Ink ready 
+
Low price point

Reasons to avoid

-
Costly cartridges
-
Flimsy plastic

At less than £40 (around $52), this three-in-one printer is something of a steal. Of course, the catch comes with the relatively high price of the inkjet cartridges, but if you take out HP’s Instant Ink subscription, even this cost drops. 

The printer itself is rather flimsy, but it’s well kitted out with Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi Direct built in for easy wireless access via the rather good HP companion app. There is no touchscreen LCD panel or automatic duplex printing, and there isn't much ink either. You'll need to replace the starter cartridges after 100 pages. 

The HP Deskjet 3630 is fairly quiet, swift, and offers decent print quality. It's designed for home and home office use, so you'll want to avoid it if you plan to print hundreds of pages every month.

Read the full review: HP Deskjet 3630 

Best wireless printers: Epson Expression Home XP-5105

(Image credit: Jim Hill)
Compact wireless printer with a surprising turn of speed

Specifications

Category: 3-in-1 colour inkjet printer
Print speed: 33ppm
Paper sizes: up to A4
Paper capacity: 150
Weight: 5.5kg

Reasons to buy

+
Compact design   
+
Fast mono printing

Reasons to avoid

-
High ink cost 
-
Dull photo prints

Epson’s conveniently compact three-in-one printer includes useful features like an SD Card slot, duplex printing, and Wi-Fi Direct (as well as Wi-Fi) at a very reasonable price point. Expensive inkjet cartridges make it uneconomical for the busy office, but for occasional use, this is a very easy and reliable wireless printer that can turn out black and white pages surprisingly quickly. 

It has a 150-sheet paper tray and a high-resolution flatbed scanner at the top. Thanks to the Epson iPrint app, printing and scanning from cloud services like Dropbox is a super smooth process. The paper also tray accepts all sizes of photo paper up to A4, but the cost of ink replacement is quite high, with high yield cartridges costing more than the printer itself. 

Read the full review here: Epson Expression Home XP-5105

We've also reviewed the best home printer, the best all-in-one printer, and the best inkjet printers


How to choose the best wireless printers for you?

When choosing the best wireless printer for yourself, begin with evaluating where you’ll be using the printer — office or home.

You’ll want to consider what kind of printing you primarily need — is it image oriented or text-heavy? If it's more of images, then you'll want to pick a wireless printer that prints high-quality images without burning a hole in your pocket. 

It’s essential for you to check the price of the printer's ink cartridge because if it’s too steep, you’ll end up spending a lot more on printing in the long run. It's best to opt for printers with super low ink costs if you're going to be printing out hundreds of pages every month. 

Other than assessing the print speed and auto duplex functionality, you’ll also want to look at the printer’s connectivity options, control panel usability, and Wi-Fi functionality.

The best wireless printers: How did we test them?

Each wireless printer we source for testing is measured on our test bench and the results are critically compared with every other model we have reviewed. Rather than relying on the manufacturer’s quoted figures, we time the first page out and print speeds in single sheet and duplex mode using a standard ten-page document and a stopwatch app.

To compare print quality, we print out the same set of test documents on every machine. These twelve test pages include text of varying font sizes and colors, mixed image and text pages, a set of photos and a series of test patterns designed to assess sharpness, color fidelity, contrast and grey scale. 

We also calculate running costs, compare functionality and consider each product’s versatility, design and build quality. The overall score reflects all of these parameters and overall value for money.

Jim is a seasoned expert when it comes to testing tech. From playing a prototype PlayStation One to meeting a man called Steve about a new kind of phone in 2007, he’s always hunting the next big thing at the bleeding edge of the electronics industry. After editing the tech section of Wired UK magazine, he is currently specialising in IT and voyaging in his VW camper van.