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Samsung LE46C750 review

An astonishingly affordable 3D TV with accomplished all-round performance

Samsung LE46C750
This LCD TV supports 2D-3D conversion so you can play standard DVDs in 3D

For

  • Very cheap for an active Full HD 3D TV
  • Good design
  • Bags of features
  • Impressive setup flexibility
  • Good 2D pictures mostly
  • Bright and colourful 3D pictures

Against

  • Crosstalk noise with 3D
  • Very limited viewing angle

Pros

  • + Very cheap for an active Full HD 3D TV
  • + Good design
  • + Bags of features
  • + Impressive setup flexibility
  • + Good 2D pictures mostly
  • + Bright and colourful 3D pictures

Cons

  • - Crosstalk noise with 3D
  • - Very limited viewing angle

One day in the not too distant future, 3D will probably be a standard feature on TVs. But for now it's another one of those new tricks for which early adopters are expected to pay a heavy price.

Even the usually budget-minded Korean brands of Samsung and LG have so far failed to make the technology truly affordable, with both including it for hefty premiums on their most cutting-edge screens.

The LE46C750 3D, however, is the first serious attempt to make three-dimensional playback available to the less well-heeled. This 46-inch LCD model using standard CCFL lighting and retails for a mere £1,500, which isn't massively more expensive than many decently featured conventional flat TVs, and is considerably cheaper than any other 3D sets we've seen.

It's a lot deeper than any other 3D screens bar Panasonic's plasmas, but we suspect that a rather chunky cabinet won't bother cash-strapped movie fans in the slightest, provided the TV delivers on performance.

John Archer

AV Technology Contributor

John has been writing about home entertainment technology for more than two decades - an especially impressive feat considering he still claims to only be 35 years old (yeah, right). In that time he’s reviewed hundreds if not thousands of TVs, projectors and speakers, and spent frankly far too long sitting by himself in a dark room.