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This is the cheapest portable monitor on the market

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John Will portable monitor - $80.74 at AliExpress
(£62.36/AU$111.92)
If you've not heard of John Will, you're not alone. However, this portable 13.3-inch monitor is currently the cheapest on the market and could make an excellent remote working companion.

We scoured the web for the cheapest portable monitor on the market and came up with this John Will display, available at AliExpress for only $80.

With a 13.3-inch screen with full HD resolution, this monitor could be great for mirroring the screen of a smaller device or as a dedicated Zoom video conferencing display.

Weighing just under 1kg, its footprint is slightly bigger than a sheet of A4 paper and a mere 12.5mm thick - and it can also be powered by USB and a 12V adaptor. Plus, it costs way less than $100, which isn't bad for a new product line this side of Black Friday 2020.

The monitor features a micro USB port, mini HDMI slot, VESA mount, a pair of speakers, an 800:1 contrast ratio, and a 178-degree viewing angle. This model comes with a battery and metal stand, but no touchscreen capabilities.

Bear in mind, it can't connect directly to a smartphone, although you should be able to hook up a Google Chromecast dongle.

It’s worth checking the full list of supported devices before you buy; the good news is that it's compatible with gaming consoles, like the Nintendo Switch.

Bear in mind

  • If this product comes from mainland China, it will take at least a month to reach the UK or the US (and potentially more). You may be levied an additional tax either directly or through the courier.
  • If you've managed to find a cheaper product with equivalent specifications, in stock and brand new, let us know and we'll tip our hat to you.
Desire Athow

Managing Editor, TechRadar Pro

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Then followed a weekly tech column in a local business magazine in Mauritius, a late night tech radio programme called Clicplus and a freelancing gig at the now-defunct, Theinquirer, with the legendary Mike Magee as mentor. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global techfests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. He has an affinity for anything hardware and staunchly refuses to stop writing reviews of obscure products or cover niche B2B software-as-a-service providers.