The best 4K TV 2023: top Ultra HDTVs for all budgets

Best 4K TV of 2023 TV on a yellow background
(Image credit: Future)
Editor's note: January 2023

The most recent additions to our best 4K TV buying guide are the TCL 6-Series and Hisense U8H, two affordable QLED models with a mini-LED backlight. We have also added LG's B2, an affordable OLED TV with cutting-edge gaming features. 

With Super Bowl LVII happening, we're seeing great discounts on many 4K TVs. It doesn’t matter if you’re looking for a 75-inch QLED or a 42-inch LG C2 OLED for gaming, now is the perfect time to be 4K TV shopping.

Al Griffin, Senior Editor – Home Entertainment

If you’re looking for the best 4K TV to refresh your at-home viewing in 2023, then this guide is for you. We’ve selected the top 4K TVs that cater to a wide range of budgets and preferences. In our list below you’ll find 4K OLED, QLED, QD-OLED, and regular LED sets from premium brands, including LG, Samsung, and Sony, along with more affordable contenders, like Hisense, TCL, and Vizio. Whatever you’re looking for, this selection should help you pick the perfect 4K TV for your home.

Not all 4K TVs are created equal, so it’s important to consider how the price and specs of each TV compare. We’ll be walking you through everything you need to know, as well as calling out important features, like Dolby Vision and Atmos, whether the displays have 120Hz support for PS5 and Xbox Series X/S gaming, and any other specific display technology details that are worth knowing. 

Many of the best 4K TVs are pricey (like the best OLED TVs, in particular), but they still pale in comparison to the extremely expensive 8K TVs that are now available. If keeping the price low is a priority for you, look at some of the cheaper 4K TV models, like the Hisense U8H and TCL 6-Series, both of which offer impressive features and performance for the money.

The best 4K TV 2023

The LG C2 oled tv is easily one of the best 4K TVs money can buy.

(Image credit: LG)
The best 4K TV for most people

Specifications

Screen size: 42-inch, 48-inch, 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch, 83-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Beautiful 4K/HDR picture
+
Four HDMI 2.1 ports
+
WebOS is fantastic

Reasons to avoid

-
Lack of cable management
-
No HDR10+ support

After dropping a few spots in 2021, the LG C2 OLED reclaims the top spot on our list of the best TVs in 2022. That's due to a number of improvements LG has made to this year's model compared to the LG C1 OLED. 

Improvements for 2022 include the new Alpha a9 Gen 5 processor, which is designed to offer better object enhancement and dynamic tone mapping than its predecessor. As well as that, you’re getting ‘virtual surround sound’, with the TV upscaling stereo content into 7.1.2-channel sound. While we weren’t convinced by the claims of virtual surround sound, the audio performance is good for a flatscreen TV, and a number of different sound modes means you should be able to find an audio profile that suits your needs. 

In addition to those improvements, the C2 OLED carries forward the four separate HDMI 2.1 ports that it inherited from the C1 OLED, meaning it's the perfect companion for the PS5, Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S. 

The LG C2 isn’t flawless, however. Off-axis color saturation does diminish a bit when you move to the left or right of the screen when compared to the new QD-OLED models and LG doesn't support either the IMAX Enhanced or HDR10+ format.

Read the full LG C2 OLED review

TCL 6-Series 2022 TV on stand displaying orange flower

(Image credit: Future)
The best budget 4K TV, with great brightness and gaming features

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 75-inch, 85-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: QLED with mini-LED
Smart TV: Roku
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision, HDR10+

Reasons to buy

+
Great brightness and contrast
+
4K 120Hz and VRR 144Hz support
+
Affordable for a mini-LED TV

Reasons to avoid

-
Thin-sounding built-in speakers
-
Picture adjustments not easily accessible
-
No ATSC 3.0 broadcast TV support

TCL’s 6-Series TVs are known for their combination of impressive picture quality and high value, and the latest version of the company’s flagship not just continues that tradition, but improves upon it. The new 6-Series arrived in late 2022, and it offers both movie fans and gamers on a budget a great big-screen option.

In the 6-Series, mini-LED tech enables high brightness, while a quantum dot layer enhances color reproduction and full array local dimming processing creates deep and detailed shadows. The set features Dolby Vision IQ to make high dynamic range images look good in both dim and well-lit environments, and HDR support extends to HDR10+ and HLG. 

Gaming features on 6-Series TV are enabled via a pair of HDMI 2.1 inputs, with onboard support for 120Hz, Variable Refresh Rate (up to 144Hz), and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM). FreeSync Premium Pro is also supported, making TCL’s flagship an obvious choice for gaming.

A new design with a sturdy center stand (55-, 65-, and 75-inch models only) improves the look of TCL’s 6-Series, and a vanishingly thin bezel creates an “all-picture” effect. Sound quality is a bit disappointing: dialogue is clear, but there’s very little bass, and a resulting thin overall audio balance. The TV’s Roku smart TV interface (a version with Google TV is also available), meanwhile, is one of the less cluttered and easy to navigate options on the market. 

Overall, the TCL latest 6-Series is a high-value TV lineup with a surprisingly high level of refinement.

Read the full TCL 6-Series review

The Samsung QN95B QLED TV on a blue background

(Image credit: Samsung)
The best 4K TV for astounding image quality in any environment

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 75-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel technology: Neo QLED
Smart TV: Tizen
HDR: HDR10, HLG, HDR10+

Reasons to buy

+
Stellar picture quality
+
Impressive sound system
+
Great One Connect box

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision
-
High-end price

The Samsung QN95B is the company’s flagship 4K TV for 2022, featuring a mini-LED backlight for dazzling HDR brightness. That backlight delivers precise local dimming and light-shaping tech so that light doesn't bleed into the darker areas. That's particularly important for movies where much of the action takes place after dark or in gloomy indoor spaces: if you struggled to see scenes in the rather murky The Batman, you won't have that problem here.

The Samsung delivers superb SDR and HDR images with deep blacks and brighter highlights, all of which are delivered without blooming or loss of shadow detail. The QN95B delivered over 2,000 nits of brightness in Filmmaker Mode in our tests, which is just astounding. Samsung's quantum dot technology delivers saturated and nuanced colours, and thanks to the Filmmaker Mode these images are also extremely accurate.

The combination of that mini-LED technology, quantum dots and Samsung's fantastic image processing is spectacular. Motion is smooth without looking artificial, 4K detail is impeccable and HD is upscaled with utter conviction. As we said in our full Samsung QN95B review, you get extreme clarity and detailing with an organic and natural feel.

The QN95A doesn’t just look good. It also sounds fantastic thanks to Object Tracking Sound Plus (OTS+), which uses an array of speakers around the TV’s ultra-slim chassis to deliver positional audio that appears to come from where the action is on-screen. 

This is another triumph of industrial design from Samsung, with a minimalist but elegant shape, solid metal stand, and nearly bezel-less screen. The connections are all pushed out to an external box that you can hide away, which connects to the TV over a single small cable. It's not just one of the best 4K TVs – it's one of the best-looking too.

Read the full Samsung QN95B review

Samsung S95B in wood-furnished living room, showing a green landscape on the TV

(Image credit: Samsung)
The best 4K TV for incredible OLED pictures

Specifications

Screen size:: 55, 65-inches
Resolution: : 4K
Panel Type:: OLED
Smart TV: : Tizen
HDR:: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG

Reasons to buy

+
Incredible ultra-slim design
+
Ground-breaking picture quality
+
Surprisingly affordable

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision support
-
Unfriendly smart TV interface

After years of rubbishing OLED, here's Samsung with an OLED TV. But it's no ordinary OLED. It's a quantum dot OLED with an incredible specification. As we said in our review, "we're looking a TV that has had the kitchen sink thrown at it, with Samsung's latest AI-inspired picture processor, a massively comprehensive and re-designed Tizen-based smart system, the latest gaming features, and even, despite the ultra-slim design, a clever object tracking sound audio system".

The QD-OLED panel delivers exceptionally bright and colourful images and comes with Samsung's Neural Quantum Processor, which draws on multiple neural networks to constantly optimise what you see on screen. It's great for upscaling HD content to 4K, and it means class-leading HDR performance too. On the subject of which, as this is a Samsung there's support for all the key HDR standards except for Dolby Vision.

The Tizen software here is decent enough but we feel Samsung has taken a step backwards with its menu design this year: the home page feels a little overwhelming, the navigation is sometimes downright odd and the menus run sluggishly when you first turn the TV on. But these irritants aside, the Samsung is a tremendous OLED display that's incredibly bright, incredibly detailed and incredible fun.

Read the full Samsung S95B review

A reddish-white feather on the Sony X90J, one of the best 4K TVs

(Image credit: Sony)
The best 4K TV all-rounder on a budget

Specifications

Screen size: 50-inch 55-inch, 65-inch, 75-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel technology: LCD
Smart TV: Google TV
HDR formats: HDR, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Best-in-class image quality
+
Easy setup and Google TV

Reasons to avoid

-
Lingering HDMI issues
-
Slight screen glare

The Sony X90J could be a good shout for those with a large enough budget who aren't bothered about a high-end OLED screen.

It has excellent image quality, thanks in part to a new Cognitive XR processor rolled out to Sony's top 2021 sets, making for excellent upscaling and contrast control. The X90J also sports the new Google TV smart platform, for easy setup and broad app support as well as the perks of Google Cast from Android devices. There's Dolby Vision HDR and Dolby Atmos audio packed in too.

When it comes to gaming, the X90J has a 120Hz panel with 4K resolution and two full-spec HDMI 2.1 ports for your Xbox Series X and PS5, with VRR (variable refresh rate) and ALLM (auto low latency mode, for sub-10ms lag) to really up your gaming experience. Just be sure to head into the picture settings and switch on 'Enhanced format' for your selected HDMI port, otherwise you won't get the benefit of its 2.1 specification.

There are still a few lingering issues, including middling off-axis viewing and struggles with direct daylight – and the X90J will no doubt be beaten by the capabilities of its step-up X95J model for a small uptick in cost. Still, the Sony X90J succeeds in delivering stellar performance for a reasonable price. 

Read the full Sony X90J 4K TV (2021) review

The LG G2 Gallery Series TV hanging on the wall.

(Image credit: LG)
The best 4K TV for ultra-stylish wall-mounting

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch, 83-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: OLED evo
Smart TV: webOS
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision, HDR10+

Reasons to buy

+
Gorgeously bright, vibrant pictures
+
Beautiful premium design

Reasons to avoid

-
Optional stand costs extra
-
No HDR10+ support

If price isn't a concern for you and you simply want the best TV you can buy at any price point – well, then you want the LG G2 OLED. The OLED65G2 uses its extra brightness to make pretty much every frame of any source you care to mention look even more sublime than it has on any LG OLED before.

Although the G2 OLED shares the same ‘Gallery’ design name as its GX and G1 predecessors, it actually looks completely different: gone is the dark frame and chamfered edges, in is a nifty two-layer effect where a thin black rear ‘slab’ sits proud of and slightly narrower than a chunkier front tier housing the screen that’s encased in a very fetching and opulent-looking silver metal coat. 

The quality of the G2 OLED’s connections is beyond reproach. In particular, all four of its HDMI ports are capable of handling the maximum 48Gbps of data supported by the HDMI 2.1 standard. This means that hardcore video gamers could simultaneously attach an Xbox Series X, PS5 and cutting-edge PC graphics rig to enjoy full-fat 4K at 120Hz, variable refresh rates and automatic low latency mode switching from all of them. That, plus you'll still have one HDMI left for adding a 4K Blu-ray player or streaming box.

To anyone familiar with LG’s OLED TVs over the years, the impact made by the extra brightness the heat sink unlocks is instantly obvious: the extra brightness gives colors more volume and punch, regardless of whether you’re talking about a very vibrant, rich tone, or a subtle, mild one. 

The end result is an OLED TV so supreme that it just barely misses the mark of our number one spot – only because its price puts it a bit far out of reach for the average TV watcher. Cinephiles, however, should certainly invest.

Read the full LG G2 OLED TV review

Sony A80K OLED TV angle showing Stranger Things

(Image credit: Future)
A mid-range OLED with top-tier performance

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: OLED
Smart TV: Google TV
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Deep blacks and impressive brightness
+
Accurate out of box color (Cinema mode)
+
Strong suite of HDMI 2.1 gaming features

Reasons to avoid

-
Brightness a notch below the top OLED TVs
-
Overly simple remote lacks backlighting
-
No HDR10+ support

Sony’s A80K lies in the middle of the company’s OLED TV line at the time of writing. Even so, the performance delivered by the 65-inch A80K set we tested proved it to be a great all-around offering for the price, and one that provides some competition to LG’s similarly priced C2 OLED TVs.

Overall picture brightness is satisfactory, if a bit below what you’ll get from the very best OLED TVs, such as the LG G2 and also the LG C2 series. Still, Sony’s mid-tier OLED manages to look great even in well-lit rooms, and it stuns in ones that are dimmed for best-quality movie viewing.

The A80K has a sleek, attractive design and a useful multi-position stand. For a set this slim, audio performance is impressive thanks to Sony’s Acoustic Surface Audio+, a feature that vibrates the screen itself to make sound, helped by two bottom-mounted subwoofers. 

Gamers will find much to like about the A80K, which provides two HDMI 2.1 inputs that support 4K 120Hz video, variable refresh rate (VRR), and auto low latency mode (ALLM). Rounding out the Sony’s excellent and highly competitive feature package is a built-in ATSC 3.0 tuner, making the A80K primed to receive next-gen digital TV broadcasts in the US. 

Read the full Sony A90K OLED TV review

Sony A90J OLED

(Image credit: Sony)
Sony advances the art of OLED with the A90J

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 83-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: OLED
Smart TV: Google TV
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Robust sound
+
Nice new OS

Reasons to avoid

-
Not exactly cheap
-
Missing some key features

Sony hasn’t held back in pricing the new A90J 4K TV with OLED, but we believe the performance does justify the hefty price tag. 

Picture quality, from any source, is about as good as it currently gets from any 4K screen, and in every meaningful department – motion control, contrast, edge definition, detail levels, you name it. For those moments when you’re reduced to watching sub-4K content, it’s great at upscaling, too. 

The Sony A90J is more than a few steps ahead when it comes to sound quality. Using the entire surface of the screen as a speaker is still novel and effective, and backing it up with two conventional bass drivers means the A90J sounds fuller, more direct and just, well, better than any alternative that doesn’t feature an off-board sound system.

Add in a smart new Google TV interface, the usual Sony standard of build and finish, feet that change position to accommodate a soundbar, an exclusive movie streaming service, and an authentically well-designed remote control, the A90J looks like the complete package. Although complete packages seldom come cheap.

Xbox Series X gamers should watch out, though, as there's no VRR support – though you'll find the 4K/120Hz capability and auto low latency mode to match any PS5 console.

Read the full Sony A90J OLED TV review (2021) review

Hisense U8H TV showing Google TV interface with Lord of the Rings on screen

(Image credit: Future)
A great 4K TV option for high quality on a budget

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 75-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel Type: QLED
Smart TV: Google TV
HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision, HDR10+

Reasons to buy

+
Mini-LED backlighting
+
Deep blacks and strong brightness
+
120 Hz, VRR, and ALLM for gaming

Reasons to avoid

-
Some backlight blooming
-
Upconverted HD images can look soft
-
Just average audio performance

The U8H series’ chief claim to fame is its mini-LED backlight, a feature first implemented in LCD TVs by rival TCL that was quickly adopted by Samsung, LG, and Sony in their own sets. A major benefit to mini-LED is high brightness – something the U8H series readily delivers.

But high brightness isn’t the only thing about the U8H that impresses. It uses a Quantum Dot filter for enhanced color, and the 504 local dimming zones on the 65-inch model deliver deep and detailed blacks. Some backlight blooming – a typical artifact with LED-backlit TVs that feature local dimming – can be seen with challenging material, but that’s the exception rather than the norm.

With support for Dolby Vision, HDR10+, and HLG, the U8H series is ready for any HDR format you stream or feed to it, and it also has a Filmmaker mode that provides mostly accurate out-of-box color. Another impressive aspect of the U8H is its extensive support for next-gen gaming consoles: along with 120 Hz display, it offers Variable Refresh Rate (VRR), Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM), and FreeSync Premium Pro.

There’s a lot to say about U8H series, but the key takeaway is that Hisense provides great value here.

Read the full Hisense 65U8H review

LG B2 OLED with Top Gun Maverick screen

(Image credit: Future)
LG’s step-up OLED looks great and has got game

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch
Resolution: 4K
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: webOS22
HDR: HDR, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+
Deep blacks and detailed shadows
+
120Hz support
+
Affordable for an OLED TV

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited brightness compared to top OLED TVs
-
Unimpressive audio performance
-
Plastic table stand

The LG B2 series is the company's step-up OLED offering from its entry level A2 OLED TVs. It provides the same basic picture quality as the A2 series, but does it one better by offering a comprehensive set of gaming-related HDMI 2.1 features such as 120Hz, Variable Refresh Rate (VRR), auto low latency mode (ALLM), and more.

Like the LG A2, LG’s B2 series TVs have limited peak brightness, making them a better option for rooms where you can carefully control lighting conditions. Otherwise, they deliver the same deep, detailed shadows, punchy HDR highlights, and excellent image uniformity you can expect from the best OLED TVs, even the pricier models. Color rendition is also a B2 series strong point, though you will need to spend time making adjustments to get it to look its best.

There’s no question that the B2 series is a great value, especially if you’re interested in using it for gaming with a PlayStation 5 or Xbox Series X console. If not, the A2 series will a more sensible option if you’re simply looking for a good, cheap OLED for watching movies.

Read the full LG B2 review

THE BEST 4K TVs 2023: FAQ

What is 4K?

4K is, essentially, an ultra-high-definition screen resolution. Also called UHD or 4K UHD, the display technology has become the default screen resolution across all of the TVs that you’re likely to see in stores today – as well as many PC monitors, too. 

The very best UHD TVs pack over eight million pixels in their high-res displays – that’s four times the amount you’ll find on the Full HD panels in today's small TVs

You don’t necessarily need access to 4K entertainment content to enjoy the benefits of 4K resolution, either, since many of the best 4K TVs (and most of those on this list) boast impressive upscaling technologies that enhance content filmed in HD.

The other reason 4K TVs have taken off in recent years is the 4K support offered by games consoles like the PS4 Pro, Xbox One X, PS5 and Xbox Series X, as well as 4K Blu-ray players and streaming devices.

Should I buy a 4K TV in 2022?

The short answer: yes! As much as 8K TVs are beginning to carve out a space in the home display market, they’re still not widely available – most brands only offer a handful of 8K models – and, of course, they’re much, much more expensive.

What’s more, 4K TVs are more affordable than they’ve ever been with plenty of TV deals available. The advent of 8K technology and ever-increasing TV screen sizes means some of the best regular-sized 4K TVs are no longer the inaccessible, wallet-hungry products they once were. 

Sure, some (like the Sony A90J OLED) still demand the big bucks, but there’s such a great range of 4K displays nowadays that you’d be hard pressed not to find a 4K TV within your budget that can deliver an amazing viewing experience.

What types of 4K TV are there?

There are plenty of different screen types out there, all working in different ways to produce the same results. Each technology has its own unique strengths and weaknesses, so here are some basics to consider when looking for the right 4K TV for your needs:

LED TV: Direct LED
These displays are backlit by an array of LEDs (light emitting diodes) directly behind the screen. This enables localised dimming – meaning immediately adjacent areas of brightness and darkness can be displayed more effectively – and greatly improves contrast. LED TVs are also more power efficient and capable of a wider colour gamut than CCFL sets. Because of the extreme cost of mounting these arrays of LEDs, cheaper TVs usually use Edge-Lit LED screens over Direct or Full-Array LED screens.

LED TV: Edge LED
With these TVs, LEDs of the backlight are mounted along the edges of the panel. This arrangement enables radically slender displays and offers superior contrast levels to CCFL, but can't achieve the same picture quality as directly lit LED sets. However, they do come in far cheaper which is why most LED TVs out there now use this technology.

OLED TV
The backlighting on OLED (organic light emitting diode) sets is achieved by passing an electric current through an emissive, electroluminescent film. This technique produces far better colours and higher contrast and also enables screens to be extremely thin and flexible. This is the holy grail display technology and LG, Sony, Philips and Panasonic have all adopted it in their flagship sets.

Quantum Dot
Quantum Dot is Samsung's big play in the LED TV space. With it, the brand claims that it's able to produce more colorful pictures than LG and Sony while offering even brighter panels. LG's Super UHD TVs all use a variation of Quantum Dot called Nano Cell, and Hisense makes a number of Quantum Dot TVs for the US and China.

Today's best 4K TV deals

Al Griffin
Senior Editor Home Entertainment, US

Al Griffin has been writing about and reviewing A/V tech since the days LaserDiscs roamed the earth, and was previously the editor of Sound & Vision magazine. 


When not reviewing the latest and greatest gear or watching movies at home, he can usually be found out and about on a bike.


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