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The LG Signature Series R: Everything we know!

(Image credit: Future)
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If you’ve been waiting on the LG Signature Series OLED TV R television to finally invest in an OLED TV, we may have some disappointing news. While the innovative, rollable OLED set was originally scheduled for a late 2019 release, we now have word that the set has been pushed back to an unspecified date.

An LG representative on the IFA 2019 show floor told us that its initial release would likely be Korea, either in 2019 or 2020, but that no Western releases to the US, UK, or otherwise currently have a firm date planned.

That could mean UK and US viewers only have to hold out another year, but it could also mean they’re left waiting until 2021 or beyond.

Why are we waiting?

The Asian TV market tends to be more accepting of unusual or variable form factors – as with TCL, which launches much bolder TV designs in China, where the company is based, than in international markets.

It’s not impossible to imagine LG only releasing the set on home turf, given the large expense incurred for mass manufacture, and the difficultly in recouping those funds when shipping and marketing abroad – all of which costs more money. 

We're assured by Kenneth Hong, Senior Director at LG Electronics, however, that the Signature Series R is getting a global release – just not immediately.

"We are still focusing on end of the year release for some market," he says. "It's going to be somewhere."

The LG Signature Series R may be a limited edition model only a handful get to experience in their homes – though given the sleek nature of the hardware, and the international coverage it’s received, we're sure those following the rollable OLED will want it sooner rather than later.

Henry is a freelance technology journalist. Before going freelance, he spent more than three years at TechRadar reporting on TVs, projectors and smart speakers as the website's Home Cinema Editor – and has been interviewed live on both BBC World News and Channel News Asia, discussing the future of transport and 4K resolution televisions respectively. As a graduate of English Literature and persistent theatre enthusiast, he'll usually be found forcing Shakespeare puns into his technology articles, which he thinks is what the Bard would have wanted. Bylines also include Edge, T3, and Little White Lies.