Samsung Galaxy S25: what we want to see

Samsung Galaxy S24 hands on handheld back straight
The Samsung Galaxy S24 (Image credit: Future | Roland Moore-Colyer)

Samsung’s Galaxy S handsets consistently rank among the best phones of any given year, so they’re always a source of excitement. That’s why even though the Samsung Galaxy S24, Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus, and Galaxy S24 Ultra have only just arrived, we’re already looking ahead to the Samsung Galaxy S25 line.

Plus, while Samsung’s latest phones are superb, they also have room for improvement, as you’ll see in our Samsung Galaxy S24 review, our Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra review, and our hands-on Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus review.

With that in mind, we’ve created a wish list of all the key upgrades we want from the Samsung Galaxy S25 line. But early rumors about these phones have also started arriving, so you’ll find those below too, and any time we hear more about these phones, we’ll add those leaks to this article.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? The next non-foldable Samsung flagship
  • When is it out? Probably early 2025
  • How much will it cost? Likely upwards of $799 / £799 / AU$1,399

Samsung Galaxy S25: potential release date and price

Samsung Galaxy S24 S24 Plus S24 Ultra hands on back straight

The S25 line will likely cost at least as much as the S24 series (Image credit: Future | Alex Walker-Todd)

Given that the Samsung Galaxy S24 line landed in January of this year, it’s likely that the Samsung Galaxy S25 series will launch in or around January of 2025. Certainly, we’d expect these phones early in 2025 anyway, as while Samsung sometimes launches new models in February, recent generations have always arrived early in the year.

These phones might be expensive though, as it’s likely that in at least some regions they’ll be powered by the upcoming Snapdragon 8 Gen 4, which itself is expected to have a price increase.

For reference, the Samsung Galaxy S24 starts at $799 / £799 / AU$1,399, so that’s probably the absolute minimum you might be able to get a Galaxy S25 for. But if the Snapdragon 8 Gen 4 does cost more than the Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 then Samsung will probably pass that price rise on to consumers. And of course the Samsung Galaxy S25 Plus and Samsung Galaxy S25 Ultra will also cost more than the price above.

The Galaxy S24 Plus starts at $999 / £999 / AU$1,699, while the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra starts at $1,299.99 / £1,249 / AU$2,199, so you’ll probably be paying that much or more for the next models.

Samsung Galaxy S25: news and leaks

There are already a few Samsung Galaxy S25 leaks, including a claim that the Galaxy S25 will use a Snapdragon 8 Gen 4 chipset, which could be significantly more powerful than the Snapdragon 8 Gen 3, as it might have a clock speed of up to 4GHz (up from 3.39GHz in the Gen 3 version used by the S24).

We’d fully expect some models of the Galaxy S25 will use this chipset, but Samsung often equips certain models in certain regions with its own Exynos chipsets instead, so don’t be surprised if that happens with the Galaxy S25 line too.

We’ve also heard some Samsung Galaxy S25 camera claims from leaker @Tech_Reve, who across multiple posts on X claimed that the Samsung Galaxy S25 and Samsung Galaxy S25 Plus will switch their main sensors to a superior Sony one, and that the Samsung Galaxy S25 Ultra will have a new 50MP ultra-wide camera, an upgraded main snapper, and a variable zoom telephoto lens, which would be able to optically zoom to multiple distances.

In another post, @Tech_Reve also claimed that the Samsung Galaxy S25 will have “significant design changes.” So don’t count on these phones looking like the current models.

It’s not clear what form these design changes might take, but leaker @BennettBuhner has claimed on X that the Galaxy S25 Ultra could have a slightly larger screen that’s closer to 6.9 inches than the 6.8 inches of the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra.

Across several other posts on X, @BennettBuhner has also claimed that the S25 line could have bigger batteries than its predecessors, and that the S25 Ultra could have a new 200MP main camera with a larger 1-inch sensor, plus an improved 50MP ultra-wide camera, a 50MP 10x zoom telephoto camera, and a 50MP 3x-5x variable zoom telephoto camera. They note however that these are incredibly early leaks, so we’d take them with a pinch of salt.

Samsung Galaxy S25: what we want to see

The Samsung Galaxy S25 series could be even more impressive than the Galaxy S24 line, if Samsung makes the following changes.

1. A new design

Samsung Galaxy S24 hands on table back

The Samsung Galaxy S24's design is due a refresh (Image credit: Future | Roland Moore-Colyer)

The Samsung Galaxy S24 and its siblings all look quite a lot like their predecessors, and the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra even looks a lot like the Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra. So we’re hoping for some more substantial design changes with the Samsung Galaxy S25 line.

The good news is that big changes are rumored, though it’s unclear what form they’ll take. But a fresh new design would help build excitement for these upcoming phones, while staying the same could leave them feeling stale.

2. Improved AI

Samsung packed the Galaxy S24 line full of AI tools and features, but as our reviews attest, these features are a mix of cool and useless, and they can even cause performance problems.

The Galaxy S24 line also lacks some of the Google Pixel 8’s best AI tools, such as the ability to sharpen old, out of focus shots.

So for the Samsung Galaxy S25 we want more AI tools and improvements to the ones that are there.

3. Slicker software

Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra showing Advanced Intelligence settings menu

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra (Image credit: Philip Berne / Future)

Samsung loves to stuff its phones full of near endless features, but this has led to bloated, clunky software, with many of the best features – including AI tools – buried several layers deep in the settings menu.

This makes the phones complex and unintuitive to use, and it’s something we really want Samsung to improve for the Galaxy S25.

4. No chipset split

The Samsung Galaxy S24 has a Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 chipset if you buy it in the US, but if you’re shopping for it in most other places then you’ll get an Exynos 2400. It’s the same deal with the Galaxy S24 Plus, though the S24 Ultra has a Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 everywhere.

With the Samsung Galaxy S25, we don’t want this split, as it means you essentially get a different phone depending on where in the world you are, and one chipset is inevitably better than the other.

Usually it’s the Snapdragon that’s better, so we’d ideally like to see the Snapdragon 8 Gen 4 used in all regions with the Galaxy S25, but we’d even take Exynos everywhere over different chipsets in different regions. At least that way it would be clearer to buyers which phone they’re getting, and whether the reviews they’ve read reflect what’s available to them.

5. The return of 10x zoom

Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra (Image credit: Future / Lance Ulanoff)

One of the more surprising decisions Samsung made with the Galaxy S24 Ultra was replacing its predecessor’s 10x optical zoom with a 5x one. This wasn’t a terrible decision, as the sensor used was a better 50MP one (up from 10MP) and it still allowed for a 10x optical quality crop.

However, it did mean the S24 Ultra’s camera lost a lens that helped it stand out from rivals – a number of which have 5x zoom cameras of their own.

So we’d like to see the 10x zoom return to the Samsung Galaxy S25 Ultra, but with an improved sensor and more megapixels, so that it can perhaps offer a 20x optical quality crop.

If Samsung also ups the number of megapixels in its 3x zoom camera then we could probably get a 5x crop from that. Or – as one leak suggests – the S25 Ultra might even have both a 10x telephoto and a variable optical zoom, that can switch between 3x and 5x.

James Rogerson

James is a freelance phones, tablets and wearables writer and sub-editor at TechRadar. He has a love for everything ‘smart’, from watches to lights, and can often be found arguing with AI assistants or drowning in the latest apps. James also contributes to 3G.co.uk, 4G.co.uk and 5G.co.uk and has written for T3, Digital Camera World, Clarity Media and others, with work on the web, in print and on TV.