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Microsoft admits there’s a serious problem with Windows 10

Windows 10 problems
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Microsoft has quietly acknowledged that some of Windows 10’s most recent updates are causing rather serious problems for some PCs.

According to the company, the KB4557957 and KB4560960 updates, which are supposed to be cumulative updates that bring numerous security fixes to Windows 10, are instead encountering a critical issue with the Local Security Authority Process.

This has led to some computers to randomly reboot – with just a “your PC will automatically restart in one minute” message as a warning.

This can be incredibly frustrating, as it means you have to quickly save any work you’ve got open. Not only is it disruptive, but it could lead to loss of data as well if you don’t save in time.

Microsoft’s on the case

The good news is that this issue, though serious, doesn’t seem to be afflicting many PCs. Microsoft is also aware of the issue, and has updated the KB4560960 documentation to warn about the issue, stating that “The Local Security Authority Subsystem Service (LSASS) file (lsass.exe) might fail on some devices” and that users may encounter an error message that says “A critical system process, C:\WINDOWS\system32\lsass.exe, failed with status code c0000008. The machine must now be restarted."

While it’s good that Microsoft has now acknowledged this problem, there isn’t an official fix at the moment, with the documentation just saying that “Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.”

Anyone suffering from this problem will be hoping that the resolution comes soon. Having a PC needing to reboot at random times is incredibly frustrating, and could end up making the machine unusable.

One way to avoid this could be to try to uninstall either the KB4557957 or KB4560960 updates, depending on what you’ve installed. Check out our guide on how to uninstall a Windows 10 update for more information.

Via ZDNet

Matt Hanson

Senior Computing editor

Matt (Twitter) is TechRadar's Senior Computing editor. Having written for a number of publications such as PC Plus, PC Format, T3 and Linux Format, there's no aspect of technology that Matt isn't passionate about, especially computing and PC gaming. If you're encountering a problem or need some advice with your PC or Mac, drop him a line on Twitter.