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This is the cheapest 8K screen on the market right now

Samsung 55 inch QLED Q900 8K TV - $2,497/£1,951 from Dell

Samsung 55 inch QLED Q900 8K TV - $2,497/£1,951 from Dell (Roughly 3,428)

If you want to make the jump to 8K now rather than waiting, Dell is offering a 29 percent discount on this 55-inch 8K Ultra HD TV from Samsung. It comes with HDR10+, 8K AI upscaling, FreeSync technology and more.

8K is one of the most hyped technologies in recent times in the world of display and AV. The resolution, which is 16 times that of full HD (1080p), promises to raise motion picture to a new level, especially when combined with other features like HDR10+.

While businesses and users are still adjusting to 4K, a technology that was unveiled nearly a decade ago now, it’s in the entertainment industry that 8K is making the biggest strides. It explains why there’s a grand total of one 8K monitor launched worldwide (the grandiose 3-year old Dell UltraSharp 32 8K otherwise known as the UP3218K).

Being the only one in the market means that it can (and does) command a steep premium; this is a US$3999.99 monitor (discounted from US$4999.99), which is still about 10x what a non-8K monitor of this size retails for. Compare that to the Samsung QN55Q900RBFXZA which is not only the cheapest 8K television out there but also the cheapest 8K display, end of.

This is a 54.6-inch screen that can display more than 33 million pixels and has a full blown 60W 4.2 Dolby-compatible audio sound system as well as a slew of other features as well. Note that you will need to have a compatible device in order to make the most of this TV.

For that you need a computer with an Nvidia Geforce RTX 3080 graphics card (that contains the indispensable HDMI 2.1) which is a much more elegant solution than getting two DisplayPort cables fed into the rear of the Dell.

Bear in mind

  • If you've managed to get hold of a cheaper product with equivalent specifications, in stock and brand new, let us know and we'll tip our hat to you.
Desire Athow

Managing Editor, TechRadar Pro

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website building and web hosting when DHTML and frames were en vogue and started writing about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium. Then followed a weekly tech column in a local business magazine in Mauritius, a late night tech radio programme called Clicplus and a freelancing gig at the now-defunct, Theinquirer, with the legendary Mike Magee as mentor. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global techfests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. He has an affinity for anything hardware and staunchly refuses to stop writing reviews of obscure products or cover niche B2B software-as-a-service providers.