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This $8,000 super computer can be yours for pennies

(Image credit: Panumas Nikhomkhai / Pexels)
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With companies of all sizes looking to boost their computing power, the amount of competition to provide such services is keener than ever.

20 years ago, the world’s most powerful computer was the Intel-powered ASCI Red. It had nearly 10,000 cores, a peak performance of 3.21 Tflops and had a cool price tag of $55 million. 

However we've moved on a lot in this time, and thanks to a new offer from web hosting company, Ionos, you can now rent a computer that’s about half as powerful for only $0.44 per hour (or $320 per month).

Power

The 4XL-192-NVME (opens in new tab) is a dedicated server that runs on an Intel Xeon Gold 6210U CPU - this Cascade-Lake processor has 20 cores, is clocked at 2.5GHz and has a peak performance of more than 1.5Tflops. It is also Intel’s leading chip when it comes to price per Flops.

This is backed by a staggering 192GB DDR4 ECC memory and a pair of Intel P4510 NVMe SSD, each with a 1TB capacity and configured in RAID-1 for redundancy. 

Ubuntu 18.04 is included as the default operating system and you can upgrade it to WIndows Server 2019. As with all Ionos dedicated servers, there's also a 1Gbps unlimited data pipe, and you can choose the location of your server (either US or Europe).

A similar Dell Poweredge T640 tower server (opens in new tab) (opens in new tab)with a slightly more powerful CPU and cheaper SATA SSD drives can be had for about $8000 after rebates.

Users will be billed per month rather than per hour, and you can cancel your package risk free for 30 days. If you're not completely satisfied, Ionos says you can cancel your contract directly in the control panel for a full refund.

Desire Athow
Desire Athow

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology during a career spanning four decades. He dabbled in website builders and web hosting when DHTML and frames were in vogue and started narrating about the impact of technology on society just before the start of the Y2K hysteria at the turn of the last millennium.