Google may have offered to change its search rankings amid allegations from the EU that it abuses its position as the dominant search provider.

A European commission anti-trust probe has been investigating whether Google unduly ranks its own products, apps, services and shopping portals higher in search results, following complaints from rivals.

It faces three other allegations that it copies content from other sites; forces exclusive advetising arrangements on sites and prevents 'the portability of advertising campaigns to competitors,' says The Guardian.

Now Google chairman Eric Schmidt has written to the commission offering compromises on those four key concerns, although the terms of the offer have not yet been made public.

Avoiding the court battle

If the commission accepts the terms then Google will make the concessions. If it rejects them, it looks like we're in for a lengthy court battle.

In a statement Google says: "We have made a proposal to address the four areas the European commission described as potential concerns. We continue to work co-operatively with the commission."

Google faces a similar probe from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in the United States.

Via: Guardian