Download of the day: Firefox Test Pilot

it's Firefox, Jim, but not as we know it

Everybody loves Firefox, but many of us still have little niggles and wish-lists of features we’d like to see. Sometimes we wonder, wouldn’t it be great if we could travel into the future, find out what Firefox can do then, and bring the future Firefox back so we can enjoy its future features right now?

That’s what Firefox Test Pilot does, and unlike traditional forms of time travel you don’t need to think about killing Hitler, bumping into Bruce Willis or accidentally kissing your mum. It’s available for Firefox on Windows, Linux and OS X.

Why you need it

You need it because the future is a better place, and because Firefox needs people to test its latest, greatest features before they end up in the final builds.

At the time of writing that means experimenting with features to take better screenshots, to keep videos on screen while you keep browsing the web, to prevent ad networks from following you around the place and even the end of dreaded 404 Page Not Found errors. All you need to do is download the Test Pilot add-on, get in a DeLorean and… no, you just need the add-on. 

Download here: Firefox Test Pilot

The best web browser 2016

It's easy to get stuck in a rut, using the same web browser for years without considering the alternatives. Whether your main priority is speed, flexibility or efficiency, there's something for you.

For more details, see our our full guide to the best web browsers

1. Google Chrome

A powerful and adaptable browser, Chrome is stable, well designed, and makes using the internet a joy.

2. Opera

Opera is an underrated browser with a superb Turbo mode for making the most of slow connections.

3. Microsoft Edge

Microsoft's new, user-friendly browser Edge is fully integrated with Windows 10's key features.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Contributor

Former lion tamer, Girls Aloud backing dancer and habitual liar Gary Marshall (Twitter, Google+) has been writing about tech since 1998, contributing sage advice and odd opinions to .net, MacFormat, Tap! and Official Windows Magazine as well as co-writing stacks of how-to tech books. "My job is to cut through the crap," he says. "And there's a lot of crap."