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Australian mobile broadband faster than fixed line speeds

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In an attempt to determine how Australia’s broadband performs on a global and domestic scale, Ookla, the company behind one of the most popular online speed tests, collected data from 16.3 million fixed-line broadband speed tests and 436,174 mobile speed tests conducted by 3.6 million Aussies in the second and third quarter of 2017. 

After crunching out the numbers, Ookla has revealed that Australia’s mobile broadband is a better performer than fixed-line internet, with the former clocking up average download speeds of 44.2Mbps – an improvement of 21.2% from the same period in 2016.

Fixed-line broadband, however, was nearly half that speed, lagging behind with an average of 24.1Mbps for downloads.

Upload speeds were 14.32Mbps for mobile compared to just 8.48Mbps for fixed line.

And the winner is…

According to Ookla’s report, Australia ranks 5th globally in terms of mean download speeds, squeezing in ahead of Singapore, but just getting beaten by the UAE.

For mobile broadband, Telstra was the best performer, clocking up a speed score – an Ookla metric that combines both download and upload speeds – of 42.28Mbps, with Adelaide coming out on top with the highest speed score for a carrier (Telstra) in a city.

Vodafone wasn’t a bad performer either, but Optus failed to impress.

Optus, however, proved to be the ‘fastest’ provider for fixed-line broadband, with an average download speed of 24.12Mbps, followed by Telstra and TPG. 

Ookla predicts that mobile broadband speeds will continue to rise, given how much the top Australian telcos have invested in improving network infrastructure, and noted that Optus in particular could leverage its “3.5GHz spectrum for 5G, which would increase their speeds considerably”.

Sharmishta Sarkar
Sharmishta Sarkar

Sharmishta is TechRadar's APAC Managing Editor and loves all things photography, something she discovered while chasing monkeys in the wilds of India (yes, she studied to be a primatologist but has since left monkey business behind). While she's happiest with a camera in her hand, she's also an avid reader and has become a passionate proponent of ereaders, having appeared on Singaporean radio to talk about the convenience of these underrated devices. When she's not testing cameras and lenses, she's discovering the joys and foibles of smart home gizmos. She also contributes to Digital Camera World and T3, and helps produce two of Future's photography print magazines in Australia.