Almost all drones in the US should be registered, FAA task force says

At least for drones that could hurt people

The US Federal Aviation Administration has released a report of recommended regulations for drones in the US, including the proposal that drones be registered with the FAA.

Under the direction of the FAA, the proposed regulations report (which can be found here) was put together by a task force made up of representatives from drone makers, tech companies, government officials and other organizations with an interest in drones.

They were tasked with providing "recommendations to the FAA 'on registration requirements and process for small UAS, including those used for commercial purposes, and all model aircraft'."

The final report recommends that all drones over 250 grams (about .55 pounds) be registered with the FAA, as the task force found that anything under this weight would not be life threatening if it fell from the sky.

How to register your drone

According to the report, the registration proposal only affects drones, officially named Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), weighing more than .55 pounds and under 55 pounds, as anything heavier falls under established FAA regulations.

For any drones in this weight category, however, the task force recommends a three part registration system for individuals, which includes filling out an electronic form, after which you'll receive an electronic certificate of registration and a personal registration number, and then marking your number on all your UAVs.

Registrants will need be to 13 years or older, and you'll only need to register once, as your registration number will cover all your drones if you have more than one.

The task force also recommends a basic training course "similar to the existing content in the Know Before You Fly campaign" be included in the registration process.

While the recommendations have yet to be approved, it is expected that they will likely be approved in a few weeks time as more drones hit the market.

Via The New York Times