Best turntables: the best record players for any budget in 2017

Best Turntables Buying Guide: Welcome to TechRadar's round-up of the best turntables (also known as record players) you can buy in 2017. 

Vinyl isn’t just a fad for hipsters and elitist audiophiles. The vinyl revival is real and it’s here to stay. As a result, audio equipment companies are releasing new turntables at different price ranges to fit any music fan’s budget. With so many new turntables being released regularly, what is the best turntable for you? 

Our best turntable buying guide will show you through the delicate details of picking the right system for your needs and budget. Direct drive? Belt drive? Do I need a phono preamp? We’ll reveal all of these answers and will get you listening to your favorite records in no time.

What’s the best turntable?

Turntables appear in all shapes and sizes with widely varied configurations. When searching for the best turntable for your needs, you’ll need to think about what materials are used, motor configuration and other features like USB ripping. 

The most crucial part of shopping for a turntable is how well damped it is. What is damping? Simply, it’s how manufacturers combat vibrations, whether external or internal, through the use of motor configurations, and different materials used. Usually, belt driven decks are seen as being quieter and therefore offering higher quality but there are direct drive (where motors are connected directly to the platter) that sound great. 

Don’t forget though, you’ll also need to consider your own personal needs. If you’re just starting out, you likely don’t need to be messing with a complex turntable with an adjustable vertical tracking angle, anti-skate and azimuth. Do you want to digitally record your vinyl collection? If so, look for a turntable with a USB output and reliable software to get the job done.

Here are our picks for best turntables:

1. Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB
2. Audio-Technica AT-LP60
3. Denon DP-300F
4. Fluance RT81
5. Pro-Ject Debut Carbon
6. Rega Planar 1
7. Marantz TT-15S1
8. Clear Audio Concept
9. Sony PS-HX500

1. Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB

The best starter turntable with all the features you’ll ever need

Dimensions: 450.0 mm (17.72") W x 352.0 mm (13.86") D x 157.0 mm (6.1") H | Motor: Direct drive | Platter: Die-cast aluminum | Phono preamp: Yes | USB: Yes | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45, 78 rpm | Stylus: AT95E

Great sound quality for the price
Great for newbies and pros alike 
Plastic build
Mediocre USB output 

The Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB is the best introductory turntable for aspiring vinyl enthusiasts. Out of the box, it features the ability to play 33 ⅓, 45 and 78 RPM, this means there will never be an album you can’t play. There’s also a built-in phono preamp so you never have to worry about finding one on your own.

New record collectors will love the easy setup and features while more vetted users will love the option to dial in the vertical tracking angle, tracking force and easily replaceable headshell. Sure, it looks like a Technics SL-1200 ripoff but at a fraction of the price, it’s entirely worth it. 

The AT-LP120-USB also comes with a USB output that allows you to record your record collection if you want. To put it simply, this deck strikes the perfect balance of ease of use for beginners while still including some more advanced features for you to grow into.

2. Audio-Technica AT-LP60

Dummy-proof automatic turntable for beginners on a budget

Dimensions: 360.0 mm (14.17") W x 97.5 mm (3.84") H x 356.0 mm (14.02") D | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Die-cast aluminum | Phono preamp: Yes | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: ATN3600

Fully automatic
Excellent value
Can’t replace cartridge 
Passable sound

If you’re not looking to drop a fortune on the best turntable in the world and don’t necessarily care about squeezing every last drop of fidelity from your LPs, the Audio-Technica AT-LP60 is a perfect starting point. It’s portable, can play most vinyl and is by far the most inexpensive turntable we have on this list. It’s also totally automatic, meaning it’ll queue a record and return the arm to resting position without requiring a manual lever. 

The only caveat with a turntable this cheap is that it won’t grow with you as your vinyl collection expands. The built-in phono preamp means you’re stuck with it, however you can replace the needle once it wears out.

While there are cheaper, poorly engineered turntables on the market, it’s not worth it, as you risk damaging your precious records with poorly aligned and improperly weighted tonearms. Vinyl is expensive so we recommend the AT-LP60 for beginners just looking to get started. 

3. Denon DP-300F

A gorgeous, full automatic turntable that doesn’t break the bank

Dimensions: 17-3/32 x 4-51/64 x 15" (434 x 122 x 381 mm); (WxHxD) | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Die-cast aluminum | Phono preamp: Yes | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: DSN-85

Fully automatic
Great sound for the price
Plastic build
Buttons feel cheap

The Denon DP-300F is a gorgeous turntable that sounds just as good as it looks. The included DSN-85 cartridge isn’t the most accurate but it nevertheless manages to make your music sound airy and reasonably detailed, especially for it’s price.You’ll need  to spend a lot more cash to hear more detail.

While the DP-300F lacks the USB outputs of some of the turntables listed here, it’s still a great starting turntable for anyone who doesn’t want to manually queue their albums or have a habit of falling asleep while listening to music. The Denon’s automatic start/stop feature means your needle won’t be worn down at the end of the record as the arm immediately returns when an album is done. 

Build quality is decent for an all-plastic turntable, but its buttons feel cheap – a minor problem but shouldn't be a deal-breaker for you. If the Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB doesn’t fit your aesthetic, consider the Denon DP-300F instead.

Read the full review: Denon DP-300F

4. Fluance RT81

An alternative to the AT-LP120-USB for those who don’t need USB

Dimensions: 16.5” x 5.5” x 13.75” | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Aluminum | Phono preamp: Yes | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: ATN95E

Great sound for the price
Decent sounding phono preamp
Poor vibration damping
No auto returning tonearm

The Fluance RT81 is an excellent starter turntable for the enthusiast. It’s simple to set up and use for newbies but you can switch out the cartridge to squeeze out more performance later on. Newbies also won’t have to worry about getting a separate phono preamp, as one is built in. However, you can turn it off if you want to use a better external preamp. 

The only downside is that Fluance’s advertised “auto-off” feature simply turns off the platter, preventing excessive needle wear but you’ll still have to return the arm to its resting place yourself. You’ll also have to manually queue records, which isn’t a deal breaker by any means but is something to consider for those looking for a fully automatic turntable. The Denon DP-300F is a great choice for those looking for a fully automated record listening experience. 

5. Pro-Ject Debut Carbon

An excellent entry-level turntable for vinyl enthusiasts

Dimensions: 415 x 118 x 320mm (WxHxD) | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Aluminum | Phono preamp: No | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: Ortofon 2M Red

Excellent value for a hi-fi turntable
Easy to setup
Manual speed change
Requires a phono preamp

Now we’re at the part of the list where things start to get a bit more serious: The Pro-Ject Debut Carbon is one of the best, if not the best entry-level hi-fi turntables you can get. 

While vinyl newcomers may balk at the price, the Debut Carbon is actually incredible value. For the money, you get an extremely well made turntable that’s damped properly for excellent sound quality. The carbon fiber tonearm is lightweight and stiff, and is usually reserved for turntables costing much more.

The Pro-Ject Debut Carbon is for the enthusiast that’s committed to the record collecting hobby and as a result, it doesn’t feature niceties like an auto-returning tonearm, buttons for changing speed or an included phono preamp. Newbies may be turned off by the manual changing of the belt position to change speeds and the lack of an included preamp. However, if you want to extract more detail and resolution from your records than the cheaper options on this list, the Debut Carbon is a great choice.

Read the full review: Pro-Ject Debut Carbon

6. Rega Planar 1

One of the best entry-level hi-fi turntables for tinkerers

Dimensions: 17.5" (450mm) W by 4.5" (115mm) H by 15" (385mm) D | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Phenolic resin | Phono preamp: No | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: Rega Carbon

Excellent sound quality
Easy to setup, even for newbies
Manual speed change
No phono preamp included

There’s a lot of debate whether the Rega Planar 1 or the Pro-Ject Debut Carbon is the best entry-level hi-fi turntable. It’s a close match and there are no clear winners, each providing an excellent starting place for audiophiles on a budget. 

While the Rega may lack the fancy carbon tone arm of the Pro-Ject, the Planar 1 still sounds excellent and is well damped with its phenolic resin platter. And for newbies, the Rega Planar 1 is still easy to setup, though you’ll have to provide your own phono preamp. 

Ultimately, the Rega Planar 1 just sounds so good that it’s hard to fault it too much. Vocals are revealing and you can hear the texture from instruments like the violin. The included Rega Carbon cartridge isn’t anything special but manages to be a great match for the turntable. It’s a tough choice between the Planar 1 and the Debut Carbon but you can’t go wrong with either.

7. Marantz TT-15S1

Go pro with this high-end turntable

Dimensions: 440mm x 350mm x 110mm; (W x D x H) | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: High-Density Acrylic | Phono preamp: No | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: Clearaudio Virtuoso

Gorgeous design
Excellent attention to detail 
Price is an investment

The Marantz TT-15S1 costs a serious bit of change, but you’re actually getting a killer bargain. The Clearaudio Virtuoso included with the turntable is $1000 when purchased separately. Additionally, you get a killer tonearm and gorgeous turntable at a price that’s definitely an investment, but not unreasonable. 

So what does the Marantz TT-15S1 get you over the competition? Attention to detail. Just about every part of the turntable has been poured over to be the best it can be for the price. The fit and finish are excellent and it’s a pleasure to handle the high-quality components. This is a turntable you’ll find yourself admiring its visual and audible qualities. 

Newbies should not get this turntable as it requires more knowledge to set up properly than the entry-level turntables on this list. But if you’re ready to take your record collecting and listening to the next level, the Marantz TT-15S1 is the perfect place to start.

8. Clear Audio Concept

A stunningly beautiful mid-range hi-fi turntable

Dimensions: 16.54” x 13.78” x 4.92”; (W x D x H) | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Polyoxymethylene | Phono preamp: No | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45, 78 rpm | Stylus: Clearaudio Concept MC

Excellent build quality 
Detailed, rich sound
Expensive (but still a bargain)

If the Clearaudio Concept and Marantz TT-15S1 seem familiar, that’s because the Marantz was built by Clearaudio to Marantz’s specifications. This means everything about the excellent build quality of the Marantz carries over to the Clearaudio Concept (i.e. this is a turntable that is as gorgeous as it sounds). 

One small but notable difference between the Marantz and the Clearaudio is the ability to play 78 rpm records. While most people will never come across 78s, it’s nice to know that the Clearaudio Concept is capable of playing them. The Concept also has a handy speed dial on the plinth, meaning you don’t have to swap the belt position manually.

As for negatives, the Clearaudio Concept has no notable flaws. Yes, it’s expensive but you’re still getting a bargain in this price range. The included Clearaudio Concept moving-coil cartridge costs $1,000 by itself. Yep! 

9. Sony PS-HX500

A well-rounded beginner turntable with some nagging flaws

Dimensions: 16.54” x 13.78” x 4.92”; (W x D x H) | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Aluminum Diecast Alloy | Phono preamp: Yes | USB: Yes 44.1kHz / 48kHz / 96kHz / 192kHz (16bit / 24bit) | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: Sony 9-885-210-05

Hi-Res audio USB recording
Good sound quality for the price
Plastic build feels cheap
Forgettable design

The Sony PS-HX500 is a great entry-level turntable for those just getting started with record collecting. Its standout feature is its ability to record Hi-Res audio from its USB output in 96kHz/24bit resolution. This is an excellent feature for those looking to digitize their records. 

In terms of sound quality, the Sony PS-HX500 sound spacious and provides good detail. However, the included needle sounds a bit harsh and sibilant at times and lacks the resolution of more expensive cartridges. 

While some may like the minimalist design of the Sony, it’s utterly forgettable and its plastic build leaves a lot to be desired. Handling the turntable on a daily basis leaves us wanting more premium materials that don’t rattle. 

  • Want to listen to digital music instead? Check out our list of the best MP3 players.