Day one: our Crackdown 3 review

Demolition man

TODO alt text

Our Verdict

Crackdown 3's campaign - whether played solo or cooperatively - doesn't try to break its own mould. The result is a fun and silly playground full of things to shoot, destroy and punch, but one with little creativity or unique spark.

For

  • Crackdown, but on a grander scale
  • Boss battles are brilliant fun
  • Non-linear mission structure = freedom

Against

  • Doesn't offer anything new
  • Missions become very repetitive
  • Some audio issues
Review Information

[This is a review in progress]

Platform: Xbox One

Time played: 10 hours

Back in 2007, the original Crackdown was a breath of fresh air for both the open-world and the third-person shooter formulas. It threw away any sense of linearity and let you, the player, explore and mete out super-powered destruction at your leisure. But a lot has changed in the 12 years that have followed, so its long-awaited threequel has plenty to live up to as Microsoft’s first exclusive of the year.

Packaged with a new Wrecking Zone multiplayer mode (a first for the series, and one that uses the power of the cloud to produce some quite breathtaking destruction physics), Crackdown 3’s campaign ticks all the boxes that made the original’s single-player romp such an addictive experience. 

As a Terry Crews-modelled agent of The Agency, you’ll explore an open-world metropolis, leaping, shooting and ground-pounding just about everything that moves. You’ll collect orbs based on your actions and level up as you go. You’ll throw cars, blow mechs to smithereens with all manner of over-sized ordinance and battle bosses in predictably spectacular fashion.

Superpowered familiarity

Terry Crews’ Jaxon gets a great intro, but after that, you’d barely know the Brooklyn Nine-Nine star was even involved. A real wasted opportunity. (Image credit: Microsoft)

Terry Crews’ Jaxon gets a great intro, but after that, you’d barely know the Brooklyn Nine-Nine star was even involved. A real wasted opportunity. (Image credit: Microsoft)

In fact, the more you play, the more you realise the campaign ticks pretty much all of the same boxes as the first Crackdown. There’s the verticality of New Providence, with its soaring buildings and structures requiring plenty of platforming feats to reach glowing agility orbs that gradually increase the length and height of your jump. In addition, there's the ability to pick up scenery and use it as cover (or as makeshift projectiles). 

There’s that familiar open approach to mission design, where you can tackle pretty much any mission as you please. You can even attack the main tower of lead villainess Elizabeth Niemand right from the moment you clear the game’s opening tutorial area. It’s even possible to make it to the top, but you’ll have a much easier time if you systematically take out her subordinates and subsequently quieten each of her defences.

In an era where other open-world franchises continue to rely on RPG levelling systems designed to actively bottleneck your progress, Crackdown 3’s steadfast dedication to letting you explore its vast playground of things to shoot, punch and collect is a welcome decision. Developer Sumo Digital has built a sandbox - which supports single-player and cooperative play (which is down to two-players from the originally planned four-player co-op) - that looks, feels and plays just like a you’d imagine another Crackdown should. 

Crackdown 3’s semi comic book-esque looks don’t stand out quite as much in 2019, but when night falls, the neon still comes out to play. (Image credit: Microsoft)

Crackdown 3’s semi comic book-esque looks don’t stand out quite as much in 2019, but when night falls, the neon still comes out to play. (Image credit: Microsoft)

But at every turn, it’s impossible to avoid the fact Crackdown 3 does very little else to really differentiate itself from its predecessors. And while it is very much derivative of itself - almost to the point it feels like a remake of the first game - Crackdown 3 does still manage to take everything you enjoyed about the series and simply turns the dial up a couple of notches.

Buildings are higher than ever and require more platforming prowess - with propaganda towers requiring some serious patience and jumping skill and air vents providing plenty of verticality when you're exploring on foot. There are more factions to systemically take apart (each based around different industries) with destruction-led missions spread across New Providence.

Harder, better, faster, stronger

Terry likes some big cans. (Image credit: Microsoft) 

Terry likes some big cans. (Image credit: Microsoft) 

Crackdown 3’s non-linear approach means you can complete each faction quest as and when you please, with a boss encounter unlocking on the map once you've collected enough intel on that respective big bad. These battles are all a riot and are easily some of the best moments in the game, ranging from ascending a tower controlled by a psychopathic AI to battling a giant mech that's determined to crush by flinging pieces of fallen masonry.

While the driving model is still a little too slippy at times, there are enough races (which automatically drop you into a car in seconds once activated) and foot races (which see you traversing rooftops at speed) so you'll always have a nearby activity to undertake. You can even collect new agents to play with, should you ever want to take a break from playing as Jaxon (although Terry Crews' involvement feels largely wasted since his character barely talks). 

It's all the usual stock filler you'd expect from an open-world, but it nails the souped-up power fantasy Crackdown does so well. It's hilarious fun, just not in a way that's going to shock or surprise you.

Races are fun once you nail the slippery racing model, and you don’t even need to drive a car up. Just hold ‘LB’ and you’ll automatically leap into one. (Image credit: Microsoft)

Races are fun once you nail the slippery racing model, and you don’t even need to drive a car up. Just hold ‘LB’ and you’ll automatically leap into one. (Image credit: Microsoft)

Performance-wise, Crackdown 3's campaign performs well for the most part. Running at 4K, New Providence is a gorgeous locale to explore, but even on a vanilla Xbox One it's still a technically and visually impressive experience (even if you can't destroy buildings in real-time in this mode). 

There's the occasional moment of slowdown, and while these instances are rare, our review build did experience a bizarre loss of sound at the same time. It's an odd issue and usually occurred when we were in the middle of a busy battle with countless enemies on-screen. Still, while it’s not a technically perfect campaign - or a wholly original one - there’s no denying its slapstick violence remains a satisfying distraction.

This is a review in progress. We’ll be reviewing the multiplayer Wrecking Zone mode when it goes live on February 15. Look out for our full verdict next week.