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At nearly $20K, the world’s most powerful laptop makes the MacBook Pro look cheap

(Image credit: Eurocom)

The most powerful laptop in the world right now is not exactly a looker - but if you're in the market for the fastest and the most capable notebook on the planet, looks are probably not a priority.

Meet the Eurocom Sky X4C- it's not as pretty or portable as the 16-inch Apple MacBook Pro, but it's a significantly more powerful option if you don’t mind the extra heft and weight.

With a maxed-out configuration, it costs a whopping $18,623 (roughly £14,300), which is more than thrice the price of the MacBook Pro’s most specced up version (costing $6,099). 

Eurocom Sky X4C - $18,623 direct
This workstation really is what dreams are made of. One of the fastest CPUs around, with as much memory as you can get and plenty of storage. With a 4K display, a top of the range GPU and tons of connection capabilities, it's the ultimate portable machine for work or play.View Deal

With the Sky X4C, you're getting a laptop that beats out 99.99 percent of desktops available today.

Joining one of the fastest CPUs available on the market (an 8-core Intel Core i9-9900KS) is an Nvidia Geforce RTX 2080 GPU with 8GB GDDR6. The machine also boasts 128GB of RAM (split over four channels), two recently-introduced Sabrent Rocket 4TB SSD cards in RAID-0 for maximum performance and two 8TB Micron SSD configured in RAID-1 for backup.

To nudge the price almost to $20,000, opt for a 3-year return to factory depot warranty plan and choose a beefier 780W external power supply unit. Most Eurocom laptops also allow the CPU and GPU to be upgraded easily.

If you know of a more powerful laptop in a 15.6-inch form factor, by all means get in touch.

Desire Athow

Managing Editor, TechRadar Pro

Désiré has been musing and writing about technology in a career spanning four decades. Following an eight-year stint at ITProPortal.com where he discovered the joys of global techfests, Désiré now heads up TechRadar Pro. He has an affinity for anything hardware and staunchly refuses to stop writing reviews of obscure products or cover niche B2B software-as-a-service providers.