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Roku's next software update will allow you to connect all your Roku audio products together

Roku Surround
(Image credit: Roku)
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Roku has announced a new update to its audio lineup that allows the Roku TV Wireless Speakers, Roku Smart Soundbar and Roku Smart Subwoofer to work in tandem to create a 4.1 surround system.

The feature, which is aptly named Roku Surround Sound, is made possible thanks to a new software update coming to the devices and can be controlled through a single Roku remote.

Roku says to expect the software roll out to happen in February, around the same time it will launch a lower-cost version of the Roku TV Wireless Speakers under Walmart’s Onn electronics brand. 

The move isn’t all that surprising - as it’s something Roku alluded to since the launch of the Roku Smart Soundbar last year - but it's definitely a good move: Roku's Smart Soundbar is a great value at $179 (around £139, AU$265), but it's not the best-sounding soundbar on its own. Hopefully, adding two rear channel speakers and a subwoofer will add some extra oomph, and bring it up to par with other surround systems like the Vizio SB36512-F6 Dolby Atmos Soundbar System.

Building a surround system, piece by piece

While the final solution remains to be tested, being able to add Roku's pieces of audio tech together sounds like a great idea in theory. It would allow people to buy a Roku Smart Soundbar first, then upgrade to a Smart Subwoofer and wireless rear speakers once they have the budget or need to do so.

Now, obviously you could go out and buy a set of speakers and a subwoofer on your own and get a similar experience without investing loads of money into Roku's product lineup but there's definitely a convenience factor by buying it all from Roku.

All that said, if you like your audio easy-to-setup, it's worth keeping Roku's new multi-piece surround setup in mind when shopping around.

  • Looking for other all-in-one solutions? Check out our list of the best soundbars

Nick Pino is the Senior Editor of Home Entertainment at TechRadar and covers TVs, headphones, speakers, video games, VR and streaming devices. He's written for TechRadar, GamesRadar, Official Xbox Magazine, PC Gamer and other outlets over the last decade, and he has a degree in computer science he's not using if anyone wants it.