The answer to the question above is no. The ScanSnap's really designed for multipage scanning, anyway. You stack your sheets up in the ADF feed (up to 50 sheets of 80gsm paper), press the button and stand back. The ScanSnap will fly through them at the rate of up to 15 pages per minute at 150dpi (you can increase the resolution to 600dpi if required). Not only that, it can scan in duplex (double-sided) mode too.

The scans are assembled onthe- fly and converted into a PDF which opens in Adobe Reader almost as soon as the last sheets are flying into the out-tray.

The ScanSnap is fast. It's more than fast. It's just amazing. The first few times you use it, a grin spreads across your face as those sheets go flying through. After that, the grin might fade, but then so does any hope of being satisfied with the performance of any other flatbed scanner.

The ScanSnap does have its disadvantages. While it autodetects page sizes and document types - cropping as necessary and deciding between black and white or colour - it doesn't always crop perfectly, and its choice of scan mode (colour vs mono) can seem a bit arbitrary, but these can be altered manually. The point is, this is a blindingly fast document scanner with no previews to crop, no TWAIN drivers to navigate and no tedious scan management as you collect multi-page scans together. All you do is press the button.

The scan quality is functional, text is legible and colours in photos come out pretty well, but the ScanSnap will never compete with proper flatbeds for quality, since it doesn't have the optical resolution for one thing.

But it will be competing against office flatbeds with automatic document feeders that cost just as much but take up space and time.

As a fast document scanner with idiot-proof controls, the ScanSnap is a little gem. Rod Lawton