Fujifilm Finepix XP10 review

Waterproof, shockproof, dustproof and freezeproof – what else does the Fuji Finepix XP10 have going for it?

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  • Good rugged design
  • Dedicated movie button
  • Price


  • Image quality
  • Not many shooting modes
  • Basic controls

The Fujifilm Finepix XP10 is a bit of a strange-looking compact camera. Without classic looks, the rounded edges and bulbous design hides a rugged camera that is water, shock, dust and freeze proof.

The buttons, as you'd expect from a camera designed to be dunked underwater, are rubberised, but they're not too difficult to push. The shutter release requires a heavy push, presumably so that it doesn't actually take pictures when you throwing it round a mountain.

Simplicity is the order of the day, and there's not a huge amount of buttons on the back of the camera, but all the basics are present and correct. It's good to see a dedicated movie button, as for the situations this camera is specifically designed for tend to rely on quickness.

The menu system isn't the most attractive we've seen, but it is fairly easy to navigate and understand, and everything makes sense. There's a minimal amount of modes on offer, but it does include Program AE, Auto, Scene Recognition, Natural Light and a number of the usual scene modes (i.e. landscape, portrait, party etc) with underwater also thrown in to make use of its waterproof capability.

Screen-wise, this isn't the best LCD we've seen on a compact by some way, but given that it's designed to be rugged, this is hardly a surprise. Still, it does the job perfectly well and is easy enough to use in bright sunlight.


News Reporter

Amy (Twitter, Google+, blog) is a freelance journalist and photographer. She worked full-time as the News Reporter / Technical Writer (cameras) across Future Publishing's photography brands and TechRadar between 2009 and 2014 having become obsessed with photography at an early age. Since graduating from Cardiff Journalism School, she's also won awards for her blogging skills and photographic prowess, and once snatched exhibition space from a Magnum photographer.