Samsung set to deliver free HDR movies very soon

4K is so last year, we want high-dynamic range video now.

Without any HDR content to play with you might be feeling a little glum about your sexy new Samsung SUHD TV right now.

But worry ye not, potentially as early as next month the Korean tech giant is going to be putting together a new UHD Video Pack to compliment its new televisions.

Samsung's latest range of 4K TVs - the Samsung UE65JS9500 and UE65JS9000 in particular - have been rather stunning to say the least, and part of that has been because of their implementation of the first flushes of high-dynamic range technology.

It may be the first we've seen of it in actual hardware but it's literally changed the way we look at TVs.

But with Netflix and Amazon's touted own-brand HDR content still a good few months away from seeing the light of day, and Ultra HD Blu-rays not appearing until the end of the year, we're left without anything to fill the void.

Samsung's new UHD Video Pack though will come with two full HDR-supported movies. It hasn't said exactly which ones yet, but considering it has been showing off HDR clips of Life of Pi and Exodus: Gods and Kings it's probably not hard to guess which ones those might be…

Like the last UHD Video Pack it will also feature other, non-HDR, 4K movies and will likely contain other documentary films to show off the glory of its SUHD panels.

We'd expect it to be following the same distribution model as the last one, namely being offered on a complimentary USB hard drive with new SUHD Samsung TVs.

And only Samsung televisions - it wont be spreading the HDR love around as the UHD Video Pack will only display on its TVs.

Via Forbes

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