Moll - are you better off with a text editor?

Possibly the only command line tool of its kind, My Collection Manager (commonly known as Moll), is barely useful enough to share the ring with the advanced graphical alternatives on this list.

In fact, all it truly offers is large empty text boxes that you can fill with data about each item.

The interface is pretty basic, but it comes with built-in documentation that can be accessed by pressing the F1 key. Unfortunately, when using Gnome Terminal to access Moll, pressing F1 will launch the terminal's help instead of the program specific help, which is awkward.

Moll

Creating a collection is an equally unrewarding affair. It's customisable only in that you can enter some text to describe the collection, which is displayed in one of the many panels that make up the collection-choosing interface. For each item in a collection, Moll also enables you to write a short description.

There's a cap on the number of words you can use for this, so you'll need to keep it simple. Everything else you wish to record about the item – such as the author, title, publisher, cast and so on – goes into the larger Description box. And that's the extent of Moll's features.

There's no search and no way to filter the collection. You can't sort items and you can't export the data you've entered either. Frankly, it's not much better than using a text editor to file your collection and the only real benefits of using it are that you can create different collections each containing any number of items, and it connects with the Berkeley database to store the data you enter for all the items entered.

Verdict

Version: 0.60
Website: http://sourceforge.net/projects/moll/
Licence: Free under GPL

Bare bones and barely more use than a text editor – avoid.

Rating: 3/10