LattePanda is a tiny board with the full power of a Windows 10 PC

LattePanda
The LattePanda is certainly a promising sounding device
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The LattePanda might sound like some kind of eco-friendly coffee, but in actual fact it's a nifty piece of technology, being a Raspberry Pi-style tiny computer which comes with Windows 10 installed for not much more than £50.

This is another Kickstarter project, and one that is certainly flying with the LattePanda managing to rack up well over double its goal, with total funding now standing at £220,000 (around $330,000, AU$450,000).

This compact board boasts an Intel Cherry Trail quad-core processor running at 1.8GHz (with a 500MHz integrated GPU) backed with either 2GB or 4GB of DDR3L RAM, and 32GB or 64GB of eMMC storage.

In terms of connectivity, you get an HDMI connector, and a USB 3.0 port along with a USB 2.0 one, and an Ethernet connector – plus on the wireless front there's Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0 on offer.

Full Windows 10

As mentioned, you get a full version of Windows 10 installed as well, meaning that the LattePanda can be used as a full PC – and an extremely portable one at that (it measures around 2.8 x 3.5-inches). Of course, it's hardly a powerhouse, but it should certainly be golden for basic computing tasks.

The manufacturer has also included an Arduino compatible processor, and this device is compatible with a wide range of sensors and hardware, so it can be used in a diverse array of projects such as, for example, the brain of a robot or controller for a security system.

Currently, you can order a standard LattePanda on Kickstarter (with 2GB of RAM, 32GB storage and Windows 10 on board) for a pledge of £53 plus £13 shipping to the UK for a total outlay of £66 (around $100, AU$135). The hardware should ship come March 2016, barring any delays.

Darren is a freelancer writing news and features for TechRadar (and occasionally T3) across a broad range of computing topics including CPUs, GPUs, various other hardware, VPNs, antivirus and more. He has written about tech for the best part of three decades, and writes books in his spare time (his debut novel - 'I Know What You Did Last Supper' - was published by Hachette UK in 2013).