Acer Chromebook R11 review

360-degree flips all day long

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Our Verdict

The Acer Chromebook R11's minimalist design may not be the sexiest, but that exterior hides a deceptively capable machine that'll last all day. Oh, and it can flip 360-degrees into a tablet. No big deal.


  • Convertible
  • Attractively minimalist
  • Good battery life


  • Terrible trackpad
  • HD-only screen

Chromebooks are in an odd spot in the laptop marketplace. Acting essentially as an access point for Google Chrome, their focus is clear and singular: the web. As such, they don't require a lot of power, and we often see a lot of similar specs no matter which manufacturer you're talking about. To stand out from the pack, Acer's Chromebook R11 has the distinction of being the company's first convertible Chromebook thanks to its 360-degree hinge.

With an attractive, if not overly-flashy design, the Acer Chromebook R11 enters the competitive arena of budget laptops carrying a recommended price tag of $329 (£221, AU$455), but it can currently be found at sub-$300 price points for the 2GB model. For comparison's sake, the 11.6-inch Chromebook R11 competes in the same range as the rugged Dell Chromebook 11 ($249, £170, AU$320) and the sleek Asus Chromebook Flip ($249, £160, AU$337), which also features a 360-degree convertible display.

Price is probably on your mind if you're looking at Chromebooks, but if your main concern is size, Apple's 11-inch MacBook Air ($899, £605, AU$1,155) will give you more sheer power and versatility over a Chrome OS machine. In exchange for power, however, you'll be missing out on the Chromebook R11's touchscreen and convertible form factor.

Acer Chromebook R11


The Acer Chromebook R11 is largely made up of a thin, white plastic chassis with a matte finish. Where that design differs, however, is on the lid of the machine, which features a textured white metal panel that looks and feels great.

In fact, that texture extends throughout the entirety of the Chromebook R11's exterior, giving the laptop a nice grippy feeling while carrying it around. It's a minor flourish, but the diamond-weave texture gives what could be a boring white slab a bit of panache. The R11 is far from what I'd consider sexy, but it's not boring either.

Acer Chromebook R11

Despite being a largely plastic affair, the R11 feels surprisingly sturdy in the hands, with little to no give whatsoever. The only complaint worth noting here is the R11's white exterior, which proved to be pretty adept at picking up various smudges seemingly at random. Truthfully, this is something you'll run into with any piece of white tech, but that textured finish may be helping to pick things up.

On the top of the Chromebook R11, you'll find the aforementioned metal panel adorned with both Acer and Chrome logos, and that's it. On the other side of the panel lies the 11.6-inch, 1,366 x 768 resolution, touch-enabled display, with a shiny Acer logo just below. On the base of the R11 sits a slightly recessed keyboard with a set of slightly-textured chiclet keys. Further below that is a relatively wide trackpad with ample palm rests.

One of the big benefits of the Chromebook R11 is its size and weight. The R11 weighs just 2.76 pounds (1.25kg), with a relatively small frame of 11.57 x 8.03 x 0.76 inches (29 x 20.3 x 1.9cm) (W x D x H). This comes in slightly smaller than the competing Dell Chromebook 11 with its 2.91 pound 11.69 x 8.57 x 0.83 inch frame. Acer's offering even compares well to the slightly smaller Asus Chromebook Flip, which weighs 1.96 pounds (0.88kg) and measures 10.6 x 7.2 x 0.6 inches.

As for ports, the Acer Chromebook R11 features one USB 2.0 and one USB 3.0 port, each occupying separate sides. There's also a full-size HDMI port with HDCP support, a headphone jack, and an SD card slot for transferring files and photos.

Acer Chromebook R11


In terms of specs, the Chromebook R11 falls right in line with the rest of the Chromebook market. Powering the machine is a 1.6GHz quad-core Intel Celeron N3150 processor, along with either 2 or 4GB of RAM. Inside, there's also 32GB of storage, which may seem small, but it's important to remember you're unlikely to be storing a ton of files on the machine itself. It's also worth mentioning that, for the time being, you'll score 100GB of free Google Drive storage when purchasing the R11, so you'll have plenty of space to store things in the cloud.

For comparison, the Acer Chromebook R11 does one-up some of the competition. The Dell Chromebook 11, for example, matches the R11 with 4GB of RAM, but falls short with 16GB of storage and the less-capable 2.6GHz dual-core Intel Celeron N2840 processor (clock speed isn't everything!). Similarly, the R11 outclasses the convertible Asus Chromebook Flip in terms of RAM and storage, with the latter sporting 2GB of memory and 16GB of internal storage.

Acer Chromebook R11

Here's the Acer Chromebook R11 configuration sent to techradar:

  • Processor: 1.6GHz quad-core Intel Celeron N3150 (quad-core, 3MB cache, up to 2.08GHz with Turbo Boost)
  • Graphics: Integrated Intel HD Graphics
  • Memory: 4GB DDR3L
  • Storage: 32GB
  • Screen: 11.6 HD, 1,366 x 768 touchscreen, LED-backlit IPS
  • Camera: 720p webcam
  • Wireless: 802.11ac (B/G/N) dual-band WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0
  • Ports: 1x USB 2.0, 1x USB 3.0, 1x HDMI with HDCP, 1x 3.5mm headphone jack, 1x SD card slot
  • Weight: 2.76lbs
  • Size: 11.57 x 8.03 x 0.76 inches (W x D x H)


In my testing, including writing this review with a dozen tabs open, the Acer Chromebook R11 performed admirably, albeit with a few minor hiccups. The combination of the Intel Celeron N3150 processor and 4GB of RAM kept things surprisingly fluid even when typing in a Google Doc with a couple of YouTube videos silently streaming and pumping jams through Google Play Music.

I did notice some minor hiccups in performance with the R11, however. Occasionally, Google Docs seemed to struggle with keeping up with my typing. The lag was infrequent and typically worked itself out in a second or so, but it broke my train of thought several times in writing this review.

Similarly, while switching between the dozen or so tabs I had running was generally fine, opening a new tab and loading something like Facebook or YouTube took a little more patience than I'm used to.

Of course, I'm coming from a fully decked-out MacBook Pro as my daily driver, so my base of comparison is a little skewed. My guess is that this simply comes down to RAM usage: I managed to stay under the 4GB cap with a large number of open tabs while streaming music and video, but only just barely. It's highly unlikely that any real world use is going to involve streaming several videos and music at the same time, so this bodes well for the 4GB R11, but it's a bit concerning for buyers who opt for 2GB of RAM.

Acer Chromebook R11


Here's how the Acer Chromebook R11 performed in our suite of benchmark tests:

  • Octane: 8,113
  • Mozilla Kraken: 4,789
  • Sunspider: 704

In the Octane test, which measures the JavaScript engine performance on any set of given hardware, the Acer Chromebook R11's score of 8,113 outperformed the Asus Chromebook Flip, which came in at 6,795 (higher is better).

Similarly, Mozilla's Kraken test, which also measures the speed and performance of the JavaScript engine on a given device, showed Acer's R11 ahead of the Flip, with scores of 4,789 and 5,447, respectively (lower is better).

In the final Sunspider test, Asus' Chromebook Flip does manage to come out ahead by a smidge with a score of 686 compared to the Acer's 704 (lower is better).