I'm not sold on the lack of a physical home button though and the volume rocker on the back looks a little strange – it could be a problem in the pocket too. I can foresee some accidental pressing when you are trying to stuff it into your jeans... which reads a lot ruder than it should. Not having Android 4.3 is annoying as it means that an inevitable update will have to happen soon after you buy it but a decent 3,000mAh battery life is certainly welcome.

Knee-jerk score: 4

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James - Reviews Editor (UK)

If that's where LG thinks I rest my index finger when I hold a smartphone, it's very much mistaken. I just tried it and it feels very uncomfortable indeed, so I'm not at all convinced by this 'rear key' idea. But maybe that's just me. Apart from that, the phone looks quite smart – plenty of cool features, the promise of an excellent screen and camera. Some cool software ideas. But there's no X-factor that I can see – the launch event was dull and uninspiring and I can't see anything in this handset that's going to persuade many people to choose it over the Galaxy S4 or HTC One.

Knee-jerk score: 3.5

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Paul - Global Editor in Chief

Given that I'm forever switching the screen off by accident when taking a photo or nearly dropping my phone while trying to change the volume during a call, moving the buttons to the back of the handset seems like a smart idea. Being able to launch the camera with a press of a button would also be welcome and, although a bit gimmicky, I have to admit that the KnockON functionality appeals. Lovely big Galaxy S4-beating screen, too, but with Android 5.0 around the corner I'd be reluctant to get tied into another long contract at this stage.

Knee-jerk score: 4

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Wil - US Editor in Chief

Putting the buttons on the back is definitely an interesting design decision. I really appreciate how it makes the device basically all screen. Of course, that Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 processor is really promising, as this handset should be fast while also boasting great battery life. Add to that 16GB and 32GB and availability on all four of the major US carriers, LG could be giving the Galaxy S4 a serious run for their money. Of course, I don't know how I'd feel once Android 5.0 comes out.

Knee-jerk score: 4

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John - Phones and Tablets Writer (UK)

I like the look of the LG G2. It seems to offer a decent package which will be able to rival the likes of the HTC One and Samsung Galaxy S4 - it's certainly got a ton of power. The buttons on the back are intriguing and, while I'm not sold on their ergonomics just yet, I'm keen to find out what they're like when I get my hands on it.

LG is capable of making quality smartphones - I love my Nexus 4, I was impressed by the Optimus 4X HD last year and the Optimus G Pro I got my mitts on earlier this year did enough to win me over. I have two big issues though - timing and availability. The 4X HD failed to make waves as it arrived months after the Galaxy S3, Xperia S and One X, while the G Pro was only released in a handful of mainly Asia-based countries.

Hopefully the G2 will get a worldwide launch which will certainly help, but I worry that it's arriving a little late to the market.

Knee-jerk score: 4.5

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Michelle - News Editor (US)

On paper, this is a really impressive phone. It packs a punch with that 2.26GHz Snapdragon 800 and carries a heavy 2GB in RAM. Throw in a 13MP camera, 5.2-inch display and a 3000mAh battery, and I'm throwing thumbs up at LG. Visually, it won't be the most striking phone on the market (that may go to the Moto X) but I like that LG is taking a chance by putting the only physical button the backside. I'm not convinced that's actually the ideal spot for it, but we'll see if it hits a chord with consumers.