The immediate thing that many have noticed from the leaked iPad App Store screens is that the iPad apps on the screens seem to cost considerably more than iPhone apps.

iPad pricing will most probably fluctuate considerably for the first few months of the new device being on sale, until the market finds an equilibrium between what consumers are willing to pay and what developers want to charge.

£10 Twitter apps anybody?

There was a smattering of £10 Twitter apps when the original App Store launched, which gives you an idea of how some developers will chance their arm when any new opportunity to make some cash presents itself.

Until consumers tell them politely to flip off by simply not buying their wares, that is.

The iPad is a far more powerful and bigger-screened device than the iPhone of course, so we can only hope that some of the new dedicated iPad apps we see arriving in the coming months are offering genuinely useful productivity services and some groundbreaking and fun new gaming experiences, which is really what is going to persuade all of us to part with our hard-earned and start buying apps for our shiny new toy.

Gizmodo has published a handy graph comparing iPad apps with the iPhone iterations. We should see on April 3 what the real differential is, when the iPad App Store launches in the US.

Via Gizmodo