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iPhone 5 getting slimmer thanks to new touch-panel tech?

iPhone 5 getting slimmer thanks to Sharp and Toshiba?
Sharp and Toshiba might be giving Apple a helping hand
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Fresh reports from Asia suggest the iPhone 5 could use new in-cell touch panel technology from Sharp and Toshiba, allowing Apple to produce a slimmer handset.

Sources in Apple's supply chain told Digitimes that Apple is likely to work with Sharp and Toshiba to create in-cell touch panels – basically combining the touch functionality with the screen itself, removing the need for extra sensors and glass.

Both Japanese firms are expected to manufacturer the new displays and the sources claim production will begin to accelerate in the coming months, in light of a potential October iPhone 5 launch date.

People want slimmer phones

The iPhone 4S is certainly not an obese handset, clocking in at 9.3mm, but it's still on the portly side when compared to the likes of the 8.9mm HTC One X, 8.5mm Samsung Galaxy S2 and 7.1mm Motorola Razr.

Apple won't want to be left behind in the design game, so we'd say it's right to expect the iPhone 5 to pack a thinner body and this new technology could well be an excellent stepping stone for the Cupertino firm to take.

As with the Samsung Galaxy S3, we're still in the dark when it comes to concrete information on the iPhone 5 but we expect it to rock up later this year, hopefully packing a quad-core processor and new design.

Find out everyone's best guesses in our iPhone 5 release date, news and rumours article, or take a peek at the video below.

From Digitimes via Cnet

John McCann
John McCann

John joined TechRadar over a decade ago as Staff Writer for Phones, and over the years has built up a vast knowledge of the tech industry. He's interviewed CEOs from some of the world's biggest tech firms, visited their HQs and has appeared on live TV and radio, including Sky News, BBC News, BBC World News, Al Jazeera, LBC and BBC Radio 4. Originally specializing in phones, tablets and wearables, John is now TechRadar's resident automotive expert, reviewing the latest and greatest EVs and PHEVs on the market. John also looks after the day-to-day running of the site.