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Google Cloud unveils Anthos Bare Metal in hybrid push

Anthos
(Image credit: Google)
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Google Cloud has announced that Anthos on Bare Metal is now generally available, unlocking new cloud and edge use cases for businesses employing bare metal hosting (opens in new tab)

The cloud modernization platform, which helps businesses build hybrid and multi-cloud applications, will be available on bare metal with either subscription or pay-as-you-go pricing.

Anthos on Bare Metal enables businesses to get the most from their existing hardware investments. A setup of two nodes with a minimum of four cores, 32GB of RAM, and 128GB of disk space should enable organizations to run Anthos on bare metal at the edge.

Businesses will have the option of running Anthos on bare metal using one of two deployment models. A standalone model allows you to manage clusters independently, while the multi-cluster model is more suitable if you want to use Anthos to build automation, enabling a central IT team to manage each cluster from a centralized admin cluster.

Cloud collaboration

So far, the response to Anthos on Bare Metal from early-access customers and design partners has been overwhelmingly positive

“No matter where you run your workloads - in Google Cloud, on-prem, in other clouds or at the edge - Anthos provides a consistent platform on which your teams can quickly build great applications that adapt to an ever-changing world,” a Google Cloud blog post (opens in new tab) explained. 

“We developed Anthos to help all organizations to tackle multi-cloud, taking advantage of modern cloud-native technologies like containers, serverless, service mesh, and consistent policy management; both in the cloud or on-premises. Now, with the option of running Anthos on bare metal, there are even more ways to enjoy the benefits of this modern cloud application stack.”

Anthos on Bare Metal has been launched in collaboration with the Anthos Ready Partner Initiative, which highlights solutions meeting Google Cloud’s interoperability requirements. The program includes solutions developed by Atos, Dell, Intel, NVIDIA, and many others.

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Barclay has been writing about technology for a decade, starting out as a freelancer with ITProPortal covering everything from London’s start-up scene to comparisons of the best cloud storage services.  After that, he spent some time as the managing editor of an online outlet focusing on cloud computing, furthering his interest in virtualization, Big Data, and the Internet of Things.