The Fitbit app can now track your blood glucose levels – here's how it works

Fitbit Inspire 2
(Image credit: Fitbit)
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The Fitbit app has a new tool that allows you to log your daily glucose levels, and prompts you to enter them every day.

Taking and tracking blood glucose levels is essential for people living with diabetes, helping them manage their condition. Keeping a record of them alongside all the data gathered by your watch (such as recent workouts, sleep, and everyday activity levels) helps you see how blood sugar levels are affected by your lifestyle.

The app can also send prompts to check your blood glucose directly to your watch, so you never forget to take a reading, and take them at the same time each day.

Fitbit devices can't measure glucose themselves; instead, the Fitbit app imports readings from the OneTouch Reveal (opens in new tab) app, which connects to the Verio Reflect (opens in new tab) smart blood sugar meter. The meter shows you at a glance whether your glucose level is within your normal range, and syncs the data with your phone so you can drill down through more data if you choose to.

OneTouch Reveal is the only app Fitbit supports right now, but you'll be able to sync data from others before long.

Fitbit blood glucose

(Image credit: Fitbit)

Take control

To get started, open the Fitbit app and select 'Discover', followed by 'Health and Fitness Stats'. Add the 'Blood Glucose' tile to your 'Today' screen, then tap it to connect your OneTouch app and meter.

It's currently rolling out to all users throughout the US, in English only, and should be available nationwide by the end of February. Hopefully it will arrive in other territories soon as well.

As Fitbit explains (opens in new tab), the new feature isn't a replacement for professional medical advice, and shouldn't be used to diagnose or treat any condition. Instead, it's for educational purposes, and can provide a useful starting point so you can discuss changes to your lifestyle with your doctor.

Cat is the editor of TechRadar's sister site Advnture. She’s a UK Athletics qualified run leader, and in her spare time enjoys nothing more than lacing up her shoes and hitting the roads and trails (the muddier, the better)