We shoot a specially designed chart in carefully controlled conditions and the resulting images are analysed using DXO Analyzer software to generate the data to produce the graphs below.

A high signal to noise ratio (SNR) indicates a cleaner and better quality image.

For more more details on how to interpret our test data, check out our full explanation of our noise and dynamic range tests.

These charts compare the results of the Samsung NX30 with the Sony NEX-6, Panasonic G6 and Olympus OM-D E-M10.

JPEG signal to noise ratio

Samsung NX30 Review
JPEG signal to noise ratio

Here we can see that the Samsung's signal to noise ratio performance is very good, being at the top of the pile for almost every sensitivity, in the lower end of the scale (ISO 100-800). At ISO 1600, it slightly dips below the Sony NEX-6, but jumps back to the top again for ISO 3200. For very high sensitivities (ISO 6400 - 12800) it is beaten by the other cameras on test.

Raw signal to noise ratio

Samsung NX30 Review
RAW signal to noise ratio

It's a slightly different story for the raw files (after conversion to TIFF), which appear to put in a much poorer performance. Here it is very closely matched with the Panasonic G6. It's likely that these results reflect how much detail is kept in raw format files allowing you to apply your own noise reduction, rather than letting the camera do it for you.

JPEG dynamic range

Samsung NX30 Review
JPEG dynamic range

For dynamic range, the JPEG files from the NX30 put in a consistent performance, being closely matched with the Panasonic G6 and the Sony NEX-6. It is clearly beaten here by the Olympus OM-D E-M10 though.

Raw dynamic range

Samsung NX30 Review
RAW dynamic range

Here again we can see a consistent performance, being most closely tied, but beating, the Panasonic G6. The Sony NEX-6 and the Olympus OM-D put in a much stronger performance here. The fairly flat shape of the graph reflects the warm saturated tones of the NX30, which is pleasing to the eye though.