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Asus P7H55-M review

Can you get the most from Clarkdale with such a reasonably priced motherboard?

Asus P7H55-M
It's a bargain MoBo, but does it deliver the performance?

TechRadar Verdict

We like the P7H55-M. It's not perfected yet, but certainly a front runner among the H55 boards.

Pros

  • +

    Incremental base clock adjustment

  • +

    Lots of over-clocking adjustments to experiment with

  • +

    USB 3.0 and SATA 600 support

  • +

    Bullet-proof BIOS

  • +

    Competitive price

Cons

  • -

    Automatic over-clocking decidedly hit and miss

  • -

    Detailed over-clocking requires technical knowledge

  • -

    Can we have a clock multiplier over 24 please?

  • -

    Limited slots and only a single x16 PCIe

  • -

    No external SATA port

The release of Intel's Clarkdale chip and its accompanying H55 chipset means new boards all round for Intel's LGA1156 boys. The shiny new P7H55-M from ASUS aims to offer a full-blooded experience at little more than budget price and comes with a raft of overclocking tools to keep the most dedicated explorer of performance tweaks happy.

It has the neat ability to adjust its base clock in 1MHz increments, and you've got a Marvell SATA controller running two internal SATA 600 ports, and two external USB 3.0 ports, so you're tooled-up for fast drives.

The feature list is full of Asus' unique features; some lovely, some fairly pointless (does anybody on earth use Express Gate?). The two Asus is most pleased about are the new green-friendly Energy Processor Unit, which does clever things to voltage and multipliers across the whole board, and Turbo Unlocker – press a button and get an instant boost with unlocked chips (they tell us).

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