Best WordPress e-commerce plugins of 2022

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REASONS TO BUY
REASONS TO AVOID
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REASONS TO AVOID
Hand pointing to digital shopping cart signifying e-commerce
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

The best WordPress e-commerce plugins make it simple and easy to set up and manage your online sales.

With the current state of the world locking us all in our homes, we are increasingly turning to the internet (as if we were not spending too much time on it already!), and if Jeff Bezos can increase his wealth by more than $185bn in 2020 by selling us stuff, why shouldn’t we tiny little people try and get some slice of the pie - even a few crumbs would be more than enough for most of us.

With that in mind, we have had a look at five of the best WordPress plugins to help you set up and manage your growing online sales empire. 

We have compared these WordPress e-commerce plugins across various factors, like their user interface, ease of setup, pricing plans, transaction fees, third-party extensions, and purchase limits. We also looked at what types of products they would be best suited to sell and how customizable they are, among other aspects.

Also, check out our reviews of the best web hosting services, the best payment gateways, and the best cloud hosting providers.

1. Wix - a top-notch website builder (opens in new tab)

1. Wix - a top-notch website builder (opens in new tab)
Wix is top dog when it comes to free website builders, but it also offers some powerful paid plans. These start from as little as $8.50 per month for the Combo plan, which gets you 3GB of storage space, a free domain and free SSL certificate.

2. Gator - a superb value website builder service (opens in new tab)

2. Gator - a superb value website builder service (opens in new tab)
Gator Website Builder from HostGator offers a superbly cheap Starter package which comes with free hosting and a domain name included, plus a free SSL certificate: all with 55% off meaning prices start from just $3.46 per month.

3. Zyro - a serious, high-quality site builder (opens in new tab)

3. Zyro - a serious, high-quality site builder (opens in new tab)
Hostinger-owned Zyro offers a website builder which is very easy-to-use and ideal for novices, allowing anyone to get their site up swiftly. You can get an extra 10% off Zyro’s already chunky discounts using the code TECHRADAR at checkout, meaning you can start building your website from just $1.70 per month.

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The best WordPress e-commerce plugins of 2022 in full

Why you can trust TechRadar Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

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1. Easy Digital Downloads

Best WordPress e-commerce plugin for selling digital products

Reasons to buy

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Only for digital sales
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Reasonable prices

Reasons to avoid

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Licensing is very limited

Easy Digital Downloads (opens in new tab) (or EDD) presents you with a clean interface to help you sell your digital products (text, audio, etc). The WordPress plugin is free, but you need to pay for the service. The installation process is as easy as you’d expect for a plugin, and you can begin to populate your store with your items.

There are various tiers to the available subscriptions, which start with Personal Pass. Some of the features at that level include an ‘add to cart’ popup, free downloads, variable printing and PDF invoices.

If you want additional features, the price goes up. Extended Pass offers you a link to Zapier, discounts, reviews and custom prices, recurring payments and content restriction.

Professional Pass adds a wish list, purchase limits, recommended products, and frontend submissions, among others.

All Access Pass is the only tier that allows you to use your account on an unlimited number of sites (the others restrict it to only one). It also includes additional features such as fraud monitor, campaign tracker, QR codes, discount code generator, and user history. 

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(Image credit: WordPress)
Powerful WordPress e-commerce plugin for existing websites

Reasons to buy

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Free option
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Can sell both physical and digital products
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Works on other platforms

Reasons to avoid

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Instant store builder is limited

Selling digital goods is one thing, but physical products haven’t stopped being popular, and being able to offer them on your site would be a great advantage to your growing online empire.

Ecwid (opens in new tab) allows you to sell both, and even includes a free option so you can start selling right away. There is a downside to it though: it limits you to only 10 products, and you can’t sell digital goods through it. But if you deal in physical products, it’s still a good way to get started.

Another advantage of Ecwid is that it isn’t a plugin, meaning you can use it to sell on other platforms as well as Wordpress. For instance, the Venture plan not only increases your inventory to 100 products, it allows you to sell digital files (up to 25GB in size), and you can also sell on Facebook and Instagram).

The Business plan includes Amazon and eBay to your arsenal, connects you to MailChimp for email marketing, and raises the number of products to 2,500.

And the Unlimited plan removed any limits to the number of products you can sell in your store, and even gives you your own iOS and Android shopping apps.

Read the full Ecwid review here. 

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(Image credit: Shopify)
Great WordPress e-commerce plugin to easily set up an ecommerce shop

Reasons to buy

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Great for beginners
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Handles everything for you

Reasons to avoid

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Transaction fees apply unless you use Shopify Payments

Setting up an e-commerce site, especially if you’re not tech savvy can be a tricky affair. Shopify (opens in new tab) aims to alleviate the situation by handling everything for you.

Like Ecwid, it’s not actually a plugin so you can use the service outside of Wordpress if you want to. As you’d expect, it also allows you to sell digital and physical products, but as an added bonus, this service lets you take payments digitally and in person - perfect if you have a shopfront.

As with the others, there are monthly fees which vary depending on the features you need. On top of that’s there’s an additional percentage fee for each payment transaction and, if you don’t use Shopify’s own payment system (which is powered by Stripe) it charges you an additional percentage (again, it’s a sliding scale depending on your tier).

This might sound like a lot, especially if you’re just starting out and have few products to sell. Thankfully, there’s also a Lite plan with just the basics.

Read our full Shopify review.

(Image credit: WordPress)

4. WP EasyCart

An affordable WordPress e-commerce plugin for all your ecommerce needs

Reasons to buy

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Free option
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Affordable subscription

Reasons to avoid

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UI is a bit awkward

Like Shopify, WPEasy Cart (opens in new tab) is aimed at businesses that want a service to handle all the hard work for them. Unlike Shopify, it’s only a WordPress plugin, but the advantage of that is that it’s much more affordable.

You can pretty much sell anything you want with this plugin, from physical products, to digital downloads (such as videos and ebooks), subscriptions, and even gift cards. There’s even an option to ask for donations.

There are multiple payment options depending on your preference, such as Stripe, Square or Paypal - the free tier charges a percentage fee per transaction, the others do not.

Unlimited products, categories and groupings are available for all tiers - even the free one - but obviously the best - like support for Apple and Google Pay, coupons, promotions, link to Quickbooks and MailChimp, and more, are reserved for paying customers.

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(Image credit: WordPress)
Excellent WordPress e-commerce plugin that's popular and versatile

Reasons to buy

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Free option
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Highly customizable
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Large third-party extension library

Reasons to avoid

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Can’t be used with free version of WordPress

WooCommerce (opens in new tab) is one of the most popular e-commerce plugins on the WordPress platform, but maybe this shouldn’t be surprising since it’s owned by Automatic, the creators of WordPress and Jetpack.

According to Built With Statistics (opens in new tab), it’s the most used e-commerce plugin in the top 1 million sites.

The plugin itself is free, and, just like WordPress, comes with a large third party extension library - and most of those come at a price.

The idea behind WooCommerce is customization - you can create the perfect shopping experience to suit your exact needs by installing the specific addons you require. In that respect, it’s a fantastic solution for tinkerers and those comfortable with such intricacies. In fact, it’s a hard one to beat. But it may well be overwhelming for those who’d rather not pop the hood to see what makes the plugin work.

Read our full Woocommerce review.

We've also highlighted the best ecommerce platforms.


How to choose the best WordPress e-commerce plugins for you?

When choosing the best WordPress e-commerce plugins for yourself, you'll want to assess your business needs and where you are currently. If you're just starting out, then a beginner-friendly e-commerce plugin for small websites will be suitable. But if you're an established website with decent traffic, then you'll want to check other options. 

Some e-commerce plugins work better for digital products, while others work well for physical products, so you'll want to keep this in mind too. You'll want to check the pricing plan, and if you're on a tight budget, look for free options. 

Lastly, look out for the plugin's customizability, third-party extension library, and the transaction fees.

The best WordPress e-commerce plugins: How we test

When testing the best WordPress e-commerce plugins, we looked at many aspects, from how user-friendly and easy they were to set up, to what business size they'd be suitable for. 

We assessed what kind of products the e-commerce plugins would be great for (digital or physical), evaluated their pricing plans, and checked their transaction fees. 

We also looked at how customizable they were, their third-party extensions, and the purchase limits, among other things.

Steve has been writing about technology since 2003. Starting with Digital Creative Arts, he's since added his tech expertise at titles such as iCreate, MacFormat, MacWorld, MacLife, and TechRadar. His focus is on the creative arts, like website builders, image manipulation, and filmmaking software, but he hasn’t shied away from more business-oriented software either. He uses many of the apps he writes about in his personal and professional life. Steve loves how computers have enabled everyone to delve into creative possibilities, and is always delighted to share his knowledge, expertise, and experience with readers.