With its muted silver colour scheme, gently rounded edges and polished finish, this Fujitsu favours subtle elegance over flash chic - a decision I'm sure will suit many readers just fine. The glass-heavy stand continues the simple but effective theme, too.

Connectivity, via the P50XTS40GS's separate media box, is plentiful. Key hookups are HDMI and two sets of component inputs, all suitable for high-definition display. Standarddefinition support comes in the guise of three Scarts (all RGB enabled) and S-video and composite video.

This panel is HD Ready, with a native resolution of 1366 x 768. Its contrast ratio is quoted at 3000:1; our Tech Labs measure it at 485:1.

Image processing is handled by AVMII: the latest generation of Fujitsu's proprietary picture improver. Benefits include mosquito noise reduction; suppression of 'ghost' edges; reduction of jaggedness around contours; reduced MPEG blocking noise; and colour tuning.

This screen is built around the Alis panel produced at the Hitachi-owned PDP panel-making facility in Miyazaki, Japan, and is an interlaced display.

There's been considerable debate about the interlaced approach, but there's no doubt that once calibrated, the 50XTS40GS's pictures can be considered excellent with HD footage - an achievement that's down in no small part to some breathtaking fine detail delivery. No other screen in its class makes ultra-detailed HD footage, such as the surface of the sea on my U-571 DVHS 1080i recording, look as sharp and realistic. And this detailing is achieved without an accompanying glut of grain.

Colour performance is warm. Images enjoy potent, rich saturations. They're also largely free of plasma's tendency to produce colour gradations.

Another common issue dealt with well is pixel noise over horizontal motion, while black levels during HD viewing are deep with plenty of subtle shadow detailing. There's impressively little grey dot crawl in darker areas, either.

The screen is less convincing with standard-definition video (DVD and DVB broadcasts); an unhealthy shade of green is noticeable in darker scenes, reds tend to become orange, and the image softens up decidedly.

The sound delivered by this Fujitsu's speaker complement is good, offering a wide-spread but coherent soundstage. Be warned, though, that adding Fujitsu's own-brand speakers means putting a whopping £249 extra on the screen's already steepish asking price.

If you're looking for a panel that's going to be devoted primarily to HD viewing, this Fujitsu is worth an audition. But if you're after more of an all-round proposition, there are 50in alternatives out there that do better for less.