Twilight

This is a weird one, but it might change your life. Or at least change the sleeping part of it.

Twilight makes some very believable claims about the blue spectrum of light emitted by mobile screens, suggesting it's these that tell our brains it's the middle of the day -- despite the fact we tend to stare at our phones in the darkness before going to bed.

By eliminating the blue light from the screen output this app supposedly alleviates the effects of looking at a bright light in a dark room, helping your brain realise it's dark and therefore bedtime. In short, it might help you sleep better if you're in the habit of using your phone before bed, in return for using a red-tinted display.

WeVideo

Best Nexus 4 apps

The Nexus 4 comes with stacks of filters and frames for making the best of still shots, but the video editor is stupidly simple, only letting users trim clips to create shorter versions of your pre-recorded films.

WeVideo adds loads more options to editing movies on the Nexus 4, letting users drag and drop videos onto a timeline to create long-form edits, add filters, drop in images and MP3s for use as a soundtrack, create titles and much more.

Google ought to buy it for a few hundred million and make it a standard thing.

Cinemagram

While Android users wait for Twitter's developers to release a version of video sharing app Vine for Android, there's this stylish alternative to practise on.

It's pretty much exactly the same as Vine, letting users record short clips, live, with the press of a button to start/stop recording, which are automatically compiled into tidy, looping edits, and chucked online to share through social sites.

There's some social network stuff built in too, but it's best used as simple a simple way to share small video files.

Dextr Email Beta

Best Nexus 4 apps

There are plenty of third-party email apps competing for installation on your Nexus 4, plus the onboard generic Email option that comes as part of Android 4.2 is certainly worth using, too.

But this one's different. It syncs with a Gmail account and replaces Google's mail tools, giving you a simpler interface built around threaded messages that pop up in a modern Android-inspired layout.

A friend system lets you sort the humans from the automated notices that plague modern email, hopefully making reading messages less of a chore.

CloudMagic

Make sense of that mass of social networks, email providers and cloud services with Cloud Magic, which lets you search through all of them in one go.

The first task is the not insignificant chore of opening the app and separately signing in to everything again, but climb that mountain of tedium and you can then use its interface to search your Google account, various social networks, Microsoft's mail systems, Evernote files and more, all through one little search box.

Do it often and you have to pay for increased access, but the occasional rummage is free -- and there's a lock screen widget for ease of access, too.