Now’s your chance to grab a cheap USB-C dongle from Apple

Using the new MacBook Pro just got a little more affordable

Apple decision to go all USB-C Thunderbolt 3 on the MacBook Pro is proving to be a huge pain for everyone. Now after wide-spread complaints, the Cupertino company is dropping the price on nearly all its adapters.

Effectively immediately and through the end of the year, Apple has cut the price of its USB-C adapters by 15% to 50%. The new pricing breakdown is as follows:  

Beyond its from its self-made adapter accessories, Apple is also instituting discounts on all third-party peripherals including a $29 SanDisk USB-C card reader that originally retailed for $49.

Even with these discounts, Apple’s accessories are still more expensive compared to those from Monoprice and Amazon Basics – and don't forget about our best USB-C accessories guide.

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However, keep in mind it can be tricky to buy USB-C accessories for the new MacBook Pros as it seems that even some products designed for the MacBook are incompatible with Apple’s newest laptop.

Discounting accessories is an unprecedented move from Apple and something it has never done before. However, it seems the company is beginning to recognize it has left its loyal user base behind with no way of connecting their existing devices to the MacBook Pro – though Apple a more visionary perspective in its own statement:

"We recognize that many users, especially pros, rely on legacy connectors to get work done today and they face a transition. We want to help them move to the latest technology and peripherals, as well as accelerate the growth of this new ecosystem. Through the end of the year, we are reducing prices on all USB-C and Thunderbolt 3 peripherals we sell, as well as the prices on Apple's USB-C adapters and cables.”  

via The Verge

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kevin has been a writer for the better part of five years covering everything from green energy to high octane cars, videogames and tech, biohacking, and even city politics. At TechRadar he's settled into a life as the Computing Editor while also covering cameras and shooting video. He can be often found in the lab testing a half dozen laptops at a time or deciding which camera bags to carry for the day.